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View Full Version : Why Are Short A2A Bows Less Accurate? Why Are Long A2A Bows More Accurate?



MLN1963
07-19-2011, 11:45 AM
So the long A2a vs short A2A thing came up again. Having only one bow I don't have a way to compare. That doesn't mean I don't have questions though? :cool:

I don't understand why a 60" bow would be more accurate than my 32" bow. We will say that both have been super tuned to the max by the same super tuner to take away any variables. If I put my short bow and a long a2a bow in a super shooter is one going to be more accurate than the other? If the points of contacts are only the grip and the d-loop I can't wrap my head around why one has a technical advantage over the other?

Jake-the-snake
07-19-2011, 12:09 PM
Every bow out there has the potential to be just as accurate as another. the Exile for example, is just as accurate as the shadowcat, if both are tuned to the max. The only thing a longer A2A helps, is the actual guy behind the bow. Longer bows are easier to hold steady. In other words....they are more forgiving

Arrow Splitter
07-19-2011, 12:15 PM
Every bow out there has the potential to be just as accurate as another. the Exile for example, is just as accurate as the shadowcat, if both are tuned to the max. The only thing a longer A2A helps, is the actual guy behind the bow. Longer bows are easier to hold steady. In other words....they are more forgivingx2 You practically took the words out of my mouth.:cool:

MLN1963
07-19-2011, 12:55 PM
I still don't see how a longer bow is more accurate when all you are using is the grip and d-loop. MAYBE I could understand if it was a finger shooter, maybe. if you grip the bows exactly the same I don't see how the result can be any different. This is going to take some real evidence for me to believe it.

Sharxfan
07-19-2011, 01:07 PM
Do you really mean brace height and not ATA? I have heard that brace height is a factor but not so much ATA length.

Arrow Splitter
07-19-2011, 01:12 PM
A long ATA bow, with a 12" or longer stabilizer is going to weigh more than a standard short ATA bow, even if you put the same stabilizer on it. This extra weight is going to stabilize the bow when it's in your hand. Think about it. When shooting a rifle that is only 5 lbs, you tend to move a little more than you would when you shoot a rifle that weighs 9lbs.

A.S

Arrow Splitter
07-19-2011, 01:16 PM
Do you really mean brace height and not ATA? I have heard that brace height is a factor but not so much ATA length.Brace height is also a factor. The longer the brace height, the more forgiving the bow is. This doesn't mean that a short brace height bow is inaccurate. It just means the shooter is doing a little more work.

bfisher
07-19-2011, 01:16 PM
Your point is valid if you are a Hooter Shooter. The point is we humans are not Hooter Shooters. We can and do make mistakes and have breakdowns in our form. This is where the longer bow will shine in comparison to the short one. The longer bow will not MOVE as much as the shorter one when we make slight mistakes.

There's always the analogy of tightrope walkers. Why do they use a long pole to help with balance? Simply because the ends, being farther from the center, are harder to move so it stays balanced better with less effort from the user. Just a matter of physics.

The same laws of physics apply when having a heavier bow and/or longer stabilizers. As mentioned, too, is brace height. Nobody has mentioned riser geometry, but this plays a major role also. Less reflex means less potetial for torque. It's not all one thing that plays a role in producing accuracy. It's the whole shooting setup. The less a bow can move at the shot the more accurate it will be in the hands of a shooter.

Sharxfan
07-19-2011, 01:18 PM
I reread some stuff on Hunters Friend and it is not so much that the bow is accurate or not it is more a matter of it exposing any flaws in your technique easier. So if you have sloppy form then it shows easier on a short ATA bow were as a longer ATA bow will allow for more sloppiness in your technique. Same with brace height from what I understand.

Destroyer
07-19-2011, 02:43 PM
Longer ATA bows are more consistently accurate due to the less acute angles. All these steep angles make a bow harder to shoot, everything is more critical, shooting & tuning. The steep angles cause more problems with cable rubbing, cutting & limb twist, etc so its harder to make a properly aligned bow with a short ATA.

Arrow Splitter
07-19-2011, 03:03 PM
Summary: Long ATA bows are more accurate than short ATA bows in the long run because they have less acute string angles, are more balanced, and overall more stable than short ATA bows.

A.S

MLN1963
07-19-2011, 04:41 PM
No shark I wasn't talking brace height. I specifically left that out of the equation. I think that BH is less of a factor with fall away rests these days.

Arrow Splitter. I made no mention of adding a stabilizer. I understand how they work and why but I'm talking only the physical shooting traits between the two length bows. Acute string angles don't seem to be a factor for a person using a release. At least I don't think it would.

Barry, I'm not sure I can follow the analogy. If the tight rope walked held the pole vertical then I can see the relationship. The pole is also MUCH longer and Much heavier heavier so I don't really think they would be equal examples. The longer bows would have a bit more weight so that could play a bit into the equation but it seems like that weight would be much more centralized.

Yep Sonny, I'm a new comer but I'm not offended a bit if my bow isn't as accurate as a Shadowcat or other long A2A bow. I am just trying to figure out why that is. I'm the kid that always asked the teacher, why. Once I understood why something was the way it was I was happy.

wscywabbit
07-19-2011, 07:56 PM
the tight rope analogy is accurate MLN, and its because of physics... if all the tight rope walker needed was weight to steady himself, he could take a 20# bowling ball and carry that across with him. However, he needs help in steadying himself, much the way we steady ourselves by throwing our arms out for balance when we feel we're about to fall.

So instead they may use a 2# 10' pole with 9# weights on the ends; still weighs 20# but with the weight spread out further from center, you introduce leverage into the equation, making it more difficult for little changes in the center to effect the balance of the whole.

If you want to try it out, take a long barbell or a broom stick and lay it across your shoulders. Sit down and turn left/right; you'll feel the resistance in your abs (this is a great exercise too!) and see how much harder you have to work when you add weight to the ends.

The same principle comes into play with longer ATA bows; the leverage from having longer ends from center makes it so that minor changes/mistakes/adjustments at center effect the balance of the whole less than a shorter ATA.

NeilMac
07-19-2011, 10:29 PM
Don't dismiss brace height, it is an important factor in accuracy, even with drop away rests.

With lower BH, the 'power stroke' of the bow lasts a little longer and despite a drop away rest, the arrow is still attached to the bow, which is still being held in your hand. If you do not follow through properly and relax from the shot too early, then that will affect your accuracy. With a short AtA bow with low brace height, any movement of you arm or hand during the loose is amplified.

Even with a long AtA bow, if I REALLY want to nail the target, I do not relax until the arrow is in the target.

MLN1963
07-20-2011, 08:00 AM
I think what I am gathering here is that it is just forgiveness that is the difference between the short and long A2A bows. The added mass is keeping the bow put during the shot making the results better if you don't do everything perfect. On the other hand if everything was equal, meaning the shooter didn't make any mistakes and had perfect repeatability (or shot in a machine), there is no advantage to the longer bow?

polaris754
07-21-2011, 11:56 AM
Ok who won lol!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! HOPE I DONT GET ANY I WANT TO KILL U MAIL FROM THIS LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Arrow Splitter
07-21-2011, 01:28 PM
gotta be spam!

me just had to. :eek: Ok, I'll ban him. LOL

polaris754
07-21-2011, 01:29 PM
um checked spam bucket empty lol !!!!!!!!!!!

polaris754
07-21-2011, 01:31 PM
hey what the heck! ban! gimmie break

Arrow Splitter
07-21-2011, 01:37 PM
hey what the heck! ban! gimmie breakJust kidding Polaris. But now that I think about it....LOL:p

polaris754
07-21-2011, 01:40 PM
HEY!!!!! callin joel!!!!!!!!!!!

Destroyer
07-21-2011, 03:43 PM
meaning the shooter didn't make any mistakes and had perfect repeatability (or shot in a machine), there is no advantage to the longer bow?

Less acute angles means less wear on the bow. Does that mean that my next bow will be long ATA? The answer might surprise you...... :p

bfisher
07-21-2011, 04:40 PM
HEY!!!!! callin joel!!!!!!!!!!!

Don't have to call Joel. I'm watchin. AS is young and impulsive. Has a sense of humor, too.

Speedykills
07-22-2011, 02:47 AM
Every bow out there has the potential to be just as accurate as another. the Exile for example, is just as accurate as the shadowcat, if both are tuned to the max. The only thing a longer A2A helps, is the actual guy behind the bow. Longer bows are easier to hold steady. In other words....they are more forgiving

I agree...............