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View Full Version : Help with my 2010 martin cheetah bowstring.



Coyotehunter11
08-11-2011, 11:09 AM
I have a martin cheetah bow. It was shooting dead on until yesterday. Now it seems that my string is twisting every time i take a shot. I am using a tru-nok loop and after every shot the loop is twisted all the way to the left. I can twist it back to the middle and it will stay until i take another shot. Now all of my shots are shooting about 4 inches to the left. Does anyone know what the problem is and can i fix it without buying a new string? Thanks alot!

gravedigger
08-11-2011, 11:19 AM
welcome to the forum,first off check and make sure your bow in in specs.check ATA,brace height,look for broken strands,make sure your rest did not come loose,make sure everything is tight.is this the stock string that came with the bow,if so it micht be time to replace.now i have not heard of this issus coming up on a well worn string so im sure one of the more expierenced archery will chime in with a pos solution

Sharxfan
08-11-2011, 12:44 PM
Make sure none of the screws in the cams/module are loose. I had that happen on my Onza. I was shooting away and then I heard a noise and turns out the DL screws had come loose. Used the blue loctite and have been fine since. May not be the fix for you but never hurts to check.

bfisher
08-11-2011, 12:45 PM
IMO this is not a good scenerio. If the twisitng is something that just started happening then it's possible that there are broken strands in the string, most notably under the center serving. Root cause? The metal loop combined with a short a2a bow makes for some very acute string angle at full draw. Notice how sharp the angle is at the loop when you draw. This constant bending against a hard object (metal loop) is not good for the string. I have seen a few strings break from the strain and it isn't pretty. The string often times just snaps and the bow goes to pieces, with the possiblity of injury to the shooter or close bystanders.

My suggestion would be to, at the very least, remove and trash the metal loop, remove the center serving and inspect the strands underneath. If it's OK then reserve and install a regular string loop. On the other end of the spectrum is to replace the string with a good aftermarket one, trash the metal loops, and install a regular string loop.

As to why you're shooting left? Just a guess here, but it seems the only thing that has changed is the string/loop orientation. I think that when you shoot the loop is swinging around to the left and hitting the arrow nock before the arrow has time to completely leave the string. This would knock the back of the arrow to the right and make it shoot left. I know it sounds far fetched, but maybe somebody else can come up with a better explanation.

And welcome to the Tech Forums.

Ehunter
08-11-2011, 01:37 PM
I have to agree with Barry on this one. I had a metal loop on an old bow of mine. Probalem I started with was hitting high/low inconsistently. Turns out the nock was sliding up and down the string. Got that fixed, and it started shooting left a few weeks later. Found out the metal loop was worn more on one side than the other from my release, and it was actually causing the string to torque to the right on release, causing the left hit. I threw it away, got a string loop, and have never looked back.

Speedykills
08-11-2011, 02:07 PM
My suggestion would be to, at the very least, remove and trash the metal loop, remove the center serving and inspect the strands underneath. If it's OK then reserve and install a regular string loop. On the other end of the spectrum is to replace the string with a good aftermarket one, trash the metal loops, and install a regular string loop.

This,save yourself a headacke.

cjchasman
08-11-2011, 02:44 PM
bfisher seems to have this one figured out. And just so you know, he knows what he's talking about. I also agree...Get rid of the metal loop BUT...I have a few more questions. How long have you been shooting this set up, how many shots b4 it turned? What type of rest do you use? What type of release do you use and how does it fit the loop? The loop is ending up to the left but do you know which way it is turning to get there? Does your center serving turn when you rotate the loop back around? Serving or loop must be loose for you to be able to turn it back...

By the way ...Welcome.

Hutch~n~Son Archery
08-11-2011, 03:15 PM
Welcome to the forum, I will have to agree with them all on this one. A metal loop doesn't help it hinders. I have used them thinking wow this will solve a lot. But in the end, it caused more headaches then they are worth. Noise, string stretch, peep rotation, inconsistent shooting etc etc.


Hutch:cool:

pizzadave
08-11-2011, 06:03 PM
First off.... I am 90% sure that what they other people are saying about strands breaking is true. My dad had one on a Hoyt Ultrasport, and it did something similar. The thing was, we didn't find it out til he replaced the loop because it was a POS. The other thing about the Cheetah is... THE FACTORY STRINGS ARE AWFUL!!! I have a cheetah, and it may be the worst factory string out there... Sooo you probably wrecked that string with the metal loop, so go get yourself some vaportrail strings, and go to a reg. d loop.

bfisher
08-12-2011, 05:13 AM
Let's clear one thing up here about the factory strings. They are not the best but far from the worst. Most entry level or medium priced bows come with similar strings. It's been that way for many years with most companies. It's just been a few years that string material has been refined and string building methods have become a real science.

Although the Double Helix strings weren't that good the new Hammerhead strings are, and they are on all 2011 bows. NOW, that being said, if there are any broken strands it is not because the string material or string itself is faulty. It's because of the metal loop constantly causing a very sharp kink when the bow is shot.

I don't think I've seen it mentioned, but another thing that a metal oop does is cause undue wear on the release jaws, often causing sharp edges. So if you do change to a regular string loop and find it fraying in a short time then it's highly likely that the release jaws need smoothed down (sandpaper) or the release needs replaced altogether.

Same can be said for shooting right off the string. If the center serving is fraying or getting cut then you are using the wrong release. I'm not saying my way is the end all, but I have used a rope release since the mid 70's. Rarely if ever do I recall having to replace center serving due to fraying. And I used to use the same strings for as long as 8 years. The rope on the release doesn't wear either. My present Cascade model 8 is 10 years old and the rope has only been replaced one time and we're talking well over 50,000 shots.

OK, I've ranted enough for now.

Hutch~n~Son Archery
08-12-2011, 10:49 AM
Coyotehunter11 this tells all take a look

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7hxjTP-8zg




Hutch:cool:

pizzadave
08-12-2011, 11:12 AM
Coyotehunter11 this tells all take a look

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7hxjTP-8zg




Hutch:cool:

Wow.... nice find Hutch.... I had no clue the string was that erratic, and how awful that heavy nocking point drives it forward.... its crazy! That poor Matthews bow looks like she's taking a beating......

Hutch~n~Son Archery
08-12-2011, 12:51 PM
I've known this ever since I used one. So that is one of the reasons I started string building. But its okay pizzadave if it beats the Matthews.:rolleyes:



Hutch:cool:

Bowhunter_IL_BT
08-12-2011, 08:23 PM
Bfisher is right about the factory strings on the 2010 Cheetahs or all 2010 gold series bows. They did not hold up well for me for a tubeless peep sight as well with the factory sting. I got a custom string through http://www.hmbowstrings.com/ last year and had no trouble since. I would take off the metal loop as well too much weight on the bowstring. A regular D loop works well anyway and they last quite a while and much lighter and less wear and tear on a sting.