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head hunter
01-29-2012, 03:36 PM
Is riser machined from solid block of aluminum,and anyone shot it? I am interested in maybe buying one.

Speedykills
01-29-2012, 04:04 PM
Pretty sure they are 3 piece riser....................

Thermodude
01-30-2012, 03:31 AM
Is the multi-block riser the norm for all of the Martin bows and has this caused any issues for anyone thats owned one?

bfisher
01-30-2012, 03:41 AM
All the Martin risers have been modular (3 pc) for several years now. The only acception to this was the S4 and now the Scepter V. This technology has proven to be very reliable so far with just a few isolated cases of the pieces loosening or shifting. In these few cases customer service has, as always, been on the ball and replaced whatever needed replaced. I would say to not let the risers become an issue in your choice of a Martin bow.

Thermodude
01-30-2012, 03:52 AM
Thanks for the info on the risers, Ive got a new Pantera on order , it will be my first Martin, looking forward to it!

head hunter
01-30-2012, 04:00 AM
Thanks, i was just reading from the 2012 catalog and a lot of the bows reads CNC machined from single block of aluminum. And I have noticed the price difference in the 2012 Exile from Supreme Archery for 374.99 and Exile pro for 323.99, the Prowler Pro is on sell for 363.99 which sounds like a good deal. In Martin catalog says Exile is CNC machined riser and under description of Exile Pro it doesn't say it. I would have thought the Exile Pro would have been more expensive. Are their Risers made exactly alike or what? I really like the looks of the Prowler Pro. So the Bengal Pro, Cougar Pro, Silencer Pro all have the 3 piece risers as well! Thanks, Jeff I am new to the Martin forums and have never owned a Martin bow so I was just doing some research before I buy one. I appreciate all you alls help.

TOMAXIMUS
01-30-2012, 05:42 AM
Martin's Website says all but the Prowler are machined from solid block aluminum. Does this mean 3 blocks?

bfisher
01-30-2012, 02:21 PM
Martin's Website says all but the Prowler are machined from solid block aluminum. Does this mean 3 blocks?

In a nutshell this is exactly what it means. This is one of the things Martin has come up with to cut costs, and ultimately be able to pass along some of this savings to the consumer. Take a good look at just how much reflex there is to these risers. Now picture just how wide a block of aluminum would have to be and how much waste there'd be to machine a riser from one solid block of material.

Now picture each piece separately. There's the section from the shelf to the bottom Roto pocket. Then there's a piece that makes up the sight window. Lastly there's the upper section from the sight window to the upper Roto pocket. Three pieces, each much smaller than the block needed to make a one piece riser. A lot less wasted material and less time to machine.

The three pieces are then drilled for stainless steel dowel pins and two holes drilled and trapped for the bolts holding them together. Not sure but I have also heard that epoxy is used, but can't confirm this.

Martin has been using this process now since 2007. It must be working well as there have been but a very few that needed replaced or repaired. So few in fact that you don't read or hear much about riser failure at all. Probably no more so than one piece risers that snap or crack. Riser problems just aren't that prevalent any more like they were when they were cast from magnesium or aluminum.

droppixel
01-30-2012, 02:40 PM
I'd like to think there is some welding involved in the process as well. wouldn't make much sense for them to do just cold connection with an epoxy additive.

Thermodude
01-30-2012, 03:21 PM
In a nutshell this is exactly what it means. This is one of the things Martin has come up with to cut costs, and ultimately be able to pass along some of this savings to the consumer. Take a good look at just how much reflex there is to these risers. Now picture just how wide a block of aluminum would have to be and how much waste there'd be to machine a riser from one solid block of material.

Now picture each piece separately. There's the section from the shelf to the bottom Roto pocket. Then there's a piece that makes up the sight window. Lastly there's the upper section from the sight window to the upper Roto pocket. Three pieces, each much smaller than the block needed to make a one piece riser. A lot less wasted material and less time to machine.

The three pieces are then drilled for stainless steel dowel pins and two holes drilled and trapped for the bolts holding them together. Not sure but I have also heard that epoxy is used, but can't confirm this.

Martin has been using this process now since 2007. It must be working well as there have been but a very few that needed replaced or repaired. So few in fact that you don't read or hear much about riser failure at all. Probably no more so than one piece risers that snap or crack. Riser problems just aren't that prevalent any more like they were when they were cast from magnesium or aluminum.

Once again thanks for the info.......obviously they are doing it right, its my first experience with this type of riser but with thier track record Im ok with it.

bfisher
01-31-2012, 03:25 AM
I'd like to think there is some welding involved in the process as well. wouldn't make much sense for them to do just cold connection with an epoxy additive.

As I mentioned this process has been used for over four years with very little problems so it makes perfect sense. I used to be a millwright in a steel mill and did my share of welding. Welding actually changes the molecular structure of the base metal, essentially making it weaker near the weld although the weld itself would be stronger than the base metal. Depending on the use I'd think the last thing you'd want to do is weaken the base metal. How many times do we read "If it ain't broken then why fix it"? This one of those applications.

TOMAXIMUS
01-31-2012, 03:44 AM
It has to be a strong connection. I can't even see where the joints are on my bow.

Thermodude
01-31-2012, 04:00 AM
This is very good information, and yes I agree 100% that the joint of the riser would be stronger than the surrounding surfice. I too work in the steel industry and I understand the pinning process spoke about. The main thing in this process is the fit and overall alignment.....no room for error here.

droppixel
01-31-2012, 05:03 AM
As I mentioned this process has been used for over four years with very little problems so it makes perfect sense. I used to be a millwright in a steel mill and did my share of welding. Welding actually changes the molecular structure of the base metal, essentially making it weaker near the weld although the weld itself would be stronger than the base metal. Depending on the use I'd think the last thing you'd want to do is weaken the base metal. How many times do we read "If it ain't broken then why fix it"? This one of those applications.

Good info - I didn't know if they did or didn't, but it was just an assumption I would have made based on what I know of metal connection. Seeing as how you have more of a hands on than me, that is interesting stuff.

MLN1963
01-31-2012, 07:30 AM
I'd like to think there is some welding involved in the process as well. wouldn't make much sense for them to do just cold connection with an epoxy additive.

Better not fly on any airplanes! Lots and lots of panels made of materials bonded together. :cool:

TOMAXIMUS
01-31-2012, 01:36 PM
There is no other place a bow owner can get info like this without having to sort through all kinds of BS and opinion. Thanks to everyone who post here and to those who just come for the knowledge. I have learned so much about Martin bows in the last year.Thank you all so much.