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E-man
02-04-2012, 06:11 PM
I shoot a Martin Exile and i wanted to know what would be a good light arrow to shoot without being too light? Is 7.4gpi too light to shoot at 70# and do you think this will crack my limbs?

droppixel
02-04-2012, 06:20 PM
You can get a 350+ grain arrow out of a 7.4 gpi shaft. I shoot Gold Tip Velocity 400s that are 7.4gpi - mine are about 340gr but I'm shooting around 65-67# I love the shafts, super strong and made clean pass on 2 deer this fall.

bfisher
02-04-2012, 06:22 PM
That depends on the length of the shaft and the rest of the components making up the arrow. At 70# you should shoot an arrow that weighs at least 350 grains. So choose your components and total their weight. Then figure the weight of the bare shaft cut to length (gpi x length). Add it all up sndd see what you get.

Gold tip has a feature on their website called "Build your own arrow". Use this for a guideline. You can use the 22 series shaft as it weighs 7.3 gpi, or the Velocity 300 which I believe is 7.4 gpi.

Frankly if you're planning a hunting setup I'd shoot a little heavier than that just to make the bow a little more quiet.

NeilMac
02-04-2012, 08:55 PM
I've used Easton Lightspeed 400's for a long time, they come out at 7.4 gpi, and they are pretty tough too.

The trouble with a lot of light shafts is that they are fragile.

Speedykills
02-05-2012, 02:45 AM
Frankly if you're planning a hunting setup I'd shoot a little heavier than that just to make the bow a little more quiet.


Ya light arrows will guarantee louder bow,been there done that.Not worth the speed gain in my opinion.

droppixel
02-05-2012, 08:21 AM
With my current set up, I'm pretty happy with where I am at with my Velocity shafts. I think they are insanely strong, have had a few break but that was due to a while shot getting hung up in my garage and a metal shelf. And another broke when I put it through a doe and she hung up on a tree breaking the shaft off.

Aside from that they have been shot quite a bit throughout the year, slapped a bunch of them and then stopped shooting groups because of it.

Was just at Dicks and they have the "off-name" Expedition arrows on sale for $25 - they have the 4" vanes on them that I would strip and refletch, they come in at 8.2gpi vs the 7.4 Velocity. Might look into those, but not 100% sold on a different shaft just yet.

bfisher
02-05-2012, 08:43 AM
$25? Is that for a hallf dozen? Even at that it isn't bad. Probably worth it to start out with budget shafts.

E-man
02-05-2012, 09:33 AM
Thanks guys, I did the math on the goldtip velocity arrows and it came up to 326.9 grains at 28in. with the nock, insert, and fieldpoint factored in. That seems pretty light because i dont want to crack my limbs any time soon. i am shooting the carbon fury arrows right now at 10.6gpi for bird hunting and i was getting 270fps out of those but i wanted to get some hunting arrows for turkey and coyote hunting. :) I am relatively new to archery and i was wondering why in general the 300 arrows are more grain weight than the 400's? :confused:

droppixel
02-05-2012, 10:06 AM
$25? Is that for a hallf dozen? Even at that it isn't bad. Probably worth it to start out with budget shafts.

Yeah $25 per half - at that price I wouldn't think twice about shooting them to heck and back. Even with those, I believe in Gold Tip enough to trust that these aren't exactly "budget typical" shafts. There are definitely some out there that are far more budge than these, that I wouldn't even consider shooting. They are Expedition Hunters 55/75 just renamed.

NuttyNative
02-05-2012, 12:21 PM
Well after a little more research I'm going to try the Easton 400 Flatlines @ 7.4gpi. The CE Mutiny's 250's are at 8.5gpi, so theres a savings of 32.45 grains right there just with the shaft. With the flatlines I should be at 332 with 85gr tips & 347 with 100's.

bfisher
02-05-2012, 04:46 PM
Thanks guys, I did the math on the goldtip velocity arrows and it came up to 326.9 grains at 28in. with the nock, insert, and fieldpoint factored in. That seems pretty light because i dont want to crack my limbs any time soon. i am shooting the carbon fury arrows right now at 10.6gpi for bird hunting and i was getting 270fps out of those but i wanted to get some hunting arrows for turkey and coyote hunting. :) I am relatively new to archery and i was wondering why in general the 300 arrows are more grain weight than the 400's? :confused:

The 300 is heavier than the 400 because the 300 is the stiffer arrow. Look on Gold Tip's website at a feature called "Build Your Own Arrow". You plug in the numbers and it calculates the total arrow weight.

MLN1963
02-05-2012, 06:31 PM
If you look around Youtube you can find a couple tests that disprove the heavy arrow down range advantage theory. They shot heavy and light arrows at distance from the same bow and the light arrows penetrated further than the heavy arrows did. Someday if I ever get a sheets of foam and build a BH target I am going to do the same test myself.

droppixel
02-06-2012, 04:20 AM
If you look around Youtube you can find a couple tests that disprove the heavy arrow down range advantage theory. They shot heavy and light arrows at distance from the same bow and the light arrows penetrated further than the heavy arrows did. Someday if I ever get a sheets of foam and build a BH target I am going to do the same test myself.

Interesting. I know there is a ton of talk about it and a lot of people are all "throw telephone poles at 'em" thought process, but I figure with the ranges I'm typically looking to shoot, my 340g arrows are going to be carrying enough zip on them to get the job done. It really all comes down to shot placement if you are looking at a hunting situation. There are said benefits to the heavier arrow in the ability to be quieter leaving the bow and yes it will have more KE initially in those short range shots, but there is a little thing known as "overkill" that I believe in. If I wasn't very confident in my ability to place my shots where I wanted them and needed the security of a heavier arrow to plaster through bone - I would look into much heavier shafts.

Ehunter
02-06-2012, 04:52 PM
My arrows are a 7.4 gpi 350 spine. I have the total arrow weight at 383 gr. 27 inch arrow, 43 gr. insert, 100 grain head, pin nock bushing and pin nock. Victory VAP's. very good arrow, but a bit pricey. Switching a few over to new 90 gr. inserts and 75 gr. heads. to try out. Total arrow weight should be about 430 gr.
I also use the same arrows with a 33 gr. insert and no pin bushing for turkey hunting. Arrow weight is right at 365 gr. if I remember right.

MLN1963
02-17-2012, 11:41 AM
Here is one guys test and I am sure I have seen more. This is just the first I could quickly find. There is not a huge difference but it blows the heavy penetration theory out of the water.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4RGcyZ_gJY

Ehunter
02-17-2012, 02:58 PM
I have gotten just the opposite results using my new arrows. Might be due to the spine difference a little, but I'm not sure. Old arrows at 383 gr. out of my FC400 were leaving about 8 inches sticking out of my target at 70 yards. New arrows at 434 gr. are burying to the fletching at 70 yards. Haven't tried them with broadheads yet, but I'd expect the same results. Waiting on some 85 gr. broadheads to show up here, then I'll test again. Old arrows were the .350 spine, new arrows are .300 spine.