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View Full Version : Spacer for arrow rest?



Gabriel454
02-18-2012, 02:46 AM
I need a spacer for the arrow rest that will increase the distance between the rest mount and the riser. I need about 3/8ths inch or more even. The whisker biscuit rest is not built to adjust far enough to the right and my compound (Martin Lynx Magnum) was shooting like a longbow without any cutout which yeah, it works thanks to the archer's paradox and the fact that I was finger shooting it. Now that I want to release shoot it because I got the release to have more trigger pull weight, I want the center shot to be on center and not way off to the left like it was.

SO, now I need some kind of spacer. I made a wooden one from corndog sticks, but I want something better. Maybe I should have some machine shop make one for me?

Any ideas would be appreciated.

Speedykills
02-18-2012, 03:17 AM
Try pop sickle sticks i hear they work better.........................................:p

elkslayer4x5
02-18-2012, 06:27 AM
You could try longer rest screws and put nuts between the rest and riser, that would move the rest away from the riser, or try a piece of plexiglass, cut to the shape of your rest mount and then run the longer screws thru the rest mount and the plexiglass shim.

Gabriel454
02-18-2012, 07:31 AM
LOL! @ popsicle sticks!

I don't think I need longer boltz, I like the plexiglass idea. I just think that corn dog sticks look horrible, but hey, who cares about looks right!?! lol!


At least I can have a chance at 3 inch groups at 20 yds right!?! LOL!

Don B
02-19-2012, 05:10 AM
Why not just change to a different rest?
There are alot of rests on the market that are not alot of money.
Are you going to be hunting with this bow or just shooting targets?
Don.

Gabriel454
02-19-2012, 07:10 AM
Why not just change to a different rest?
There are alot of rests on the market that are not alot of money.
Are you going to be hunting with this bow or just shooting targets?
Don.

I will be mainly shooting targets, but I want to be able to hunt if I need to so I want to be able to broad head tune it.

Gabriel454
02-19-2012, 08:17 PM
This is what I mean by broadhead tuning.

http://martinarchery.com/mtechforum/showthread.php?23013-Broadhead-Tuning

VIDEO from other thread


http://youtu.be/k24a-SxaUj4

Gabriel454
02-19-2012, 08:22 PM
Could it actually be that broadheads do NOT turn the arrow, but arrow spine does, the arrow front is more stable with a broad head. The shape is like a wing on a missile. Arrows that are paper tuned look to me like they might wobble enough at the back end to create slight amounts of lift with the front end and move the front end. This could be a good thing if you were going for a target further away from you. Yes, this is rocket science!

My idea is to make the blades of the broadhead the same as you do fletching because the angles across the head will be different and therefore will put their energy into spinning the arrow. I have probably already said too much. =0)

EDIT:: NEvermind. I can't say too much about it. I think that by changing the forces and the angles of attack I can make a bow accurate at longer ranges.

EDTI EDIT:: I used to be into paintball and I made my own barrels and stuff. I tried to do a double round burst, but the mechanism needed damped by something and it became a 5 round burst that chopped the last three rounds no matter what I did to it. Vices are good when testing paint ball guns. Pieces can fly off easily if something jams or comes undone. I used a vice and string on the trigger to test it with and ran out of time when I started working driving a forklift. I was going for a long range double whammy. Then I just put two guns together like a sniper shotgun. Sometimes the balls hit in mid air.

bfisher
02-20-2012, 03:07 AM
The idea of angling or spiralling the blades has already been done (Crimson Talon). The only way for this idea to work correctly would be to have the blades and the fletching set at the same angle. Otherwise they would both give the arrow a different rate of spin. The broadhead (blades) are not supposed to spin the arow anyway. That is the purpose of the fletching. Their purpose is to spin the arrow and create enough drag to stabilize the arrow, keeping it on it's intended path. The tip has to be heavy enough to "pull" the arrow down range while the fletching creates enough drag to keep the tail end from trying to overtake the front end. Too much drag or not enough weight on the front can cause the arrow to drift as it flies, opening up groups at longer ranges.

The other problem with angled or spiralled blades is that once they enter flesh they keep on rotating the arrow. This causes unwanted friction which actually reduces potential penetration.

Gabriel454
02-20-2012, 07:38 PM
The idea of angling or spiralling the blades has already been done (Crimson Talon). The only way for this idea to work correctly would be to have the blades and the fletching set at the same angle. Otherwise they would both give the arrow a different rate of spin. The broadhead (blades) are not supposed to spin the arow anyway. That is the purpose of the fletching. Their purpose is to spin the arrow and create enough drag to stabilize the arrow, keeping it on it's intended path. The tip has to be heavy enough to "pull" the arrow down range while the fletching creates enough drag to keep the tail end from trying to overtake the front end. Too much drag or not enough weight on the front can cause the arrow to drift as it flies, opening up groups at longer ranges.
no
The other problem with angled or spiralled blades is that once they enter flesh they keep on rotating the arrow. This causes unwanted friction which actually reduces potential penetration.

Okay I wondered why there weren't any that had any helix. I could probably make a mechanical that would straighten the blades on impact, but by the time I do all that I might as well have a mechanical where the blades turn out on impact.

I think that having more weight would be okay, but some of the kinetic energy will be lost in gaining altitude to compensate for a heavier arrow.

It might be interesting to see if I could mold the blades so that they would have an airfoil shape that will cause lift, reduce drag, and spin the shaft that way, but as you stated, the fletching will have to have the correct helix in order to spin the arrow at the same rate. Scratch that. The problem is that the broad head, while great for enlarging the hole and causing hemorrhaging damages the arrow flight no matter how you look at it. So, a longer thinner blade would probably be the best for penetration and cutting area as well as the best for flight right up until it encounters a bone...

I think I'll just continue to tune up my bow for a while and just worry about making it perfect.

Gabriel454
02-21-2012, 07:08 AM
I understand now that the blade is not just for slicing a bigger hole, but also for penetration.

http://youtu.be/DEQBLu8c1gQ