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View Full Version : Why mechanicals?



Thermodude
05-11-2012, 06:14 AM
Im curious about this subject, Ive read so many debats and arguments about this. What is the main reason for using mechanical broadheads? Ill be up front right away and say that I dont believe in them, but thats not what this thread is about. My opinion is mine and Im not going to try and bash someone for using them. I just know what I read on AT and hear at the archery shops. Whats the number one appeal?

Arrow Splitter
05-11-2012, 07:18 AM
I believe part of it is they are advertised to fly like field points. Of course, this isn't true, but I think it works to sell them.

A.S

Money Man
05-11-2012, 07:27 AM
I think a lot of people are attracted to the larger cutting diameter also. I know society is stuck on bigger is better, but I think that when you are trying to make a humane kill, you need to be careful to not get too big of a cutting diameter, that all you end up doing is deflecting your shot off bones. A bullet can break bones, but an arrow, not so much. How many places are there on an animal that you can put a 2 inch plus broad head through without hitting and possibly deflecting off of bone?

elkslayer4x5
05-11-2012, 09:05 AM
I think AS has it right, "they fly like my field points" sells a lot of mechanicals for those who have to pay to get their bow tuned, those guys who pick their bow a week before season opens. JMO :)

SJunior
05-11-2012, 10:15 AM
I always swore off mechanicals, especially after helping my cousin track a buck he shot and lost the trail then I found it 200 yards past the last blood without a drop on the ground.

Last fall I decided if I was going to judge something that i'd better try it myself. After looking at all that was out there I went with the G5 T3 due to the blades being totally exposed. Took 3 deer with 2 going through major bone and they worked flawlessly. I wouldn't hesitate to use them again.

TEN RING
05-11-2012, 10:17 AM
I have been using them for about 20 years now, I use my 3d set up for hunting I know they hit the same spot as my field points because I shoot them to see, where the hit,thats where the problem lays some people just screw them on because it said they fly like field points and some are better then other as far as flying and opening up and bringing down your game,the same can be said about fixed blades

TEN RING
05-11-2012, 10:30 AM
I started out with pucket blood trailers shot my a deer with them said to myself these thing are great then the next deer I shot they didn't open went back to fixed blades until I came a cross the rocket mini blasters and never looked back

Shot placesment is still every thing fix blade or not or rifle how many people lose there game with a rifle is it the rifle or the shooter

Thermodude
05-11-2012, 10:33 AM
I started out with pucket blood trailers shot my a deer with them said to myself these thing are great then the next deer I shot they didn't open went back to fixed blades until I came a cross the rocket mini blasters and never looked back

Shot placesment is still every thing fix blade or not or rifle how many people lose there game with a rifle is it the rifle or the shooter

The one and only I ever used was way back in the day..........Punch Cutters! Ive gotta say, those were one of the worst heads that ever hit the market.

droppixel
05-11-2012, 10:36 AM
Mechanicals are all I have ever known, so that is what I go with. And so far I live by if it ain't broke ... don't fix it. Shot G5 T3 this past season and wow was I happy. I'm not saying I would never shoot a fixed blade, but when these heads are doing what they are, I have no reason to shoot something else. While I'm a mech shooter, I absolutely will not buy into the Rage craze or be majorly influenced by what others say I should be shooting. I'm smart enough to make the decisions for myself and respect those of others, minus the Rage shooters ;)

Fixed blades are just as proven as the mechs, so really can't say there is a benefit to one over the other, it's all personal flavor I think.

bfisher
05-11-2012, 11:08 AM
A hit it pretty well. They hit the same place as field points. Of course this is the WHY of the acceptsance of mechanicals in the first place. That was years ago. It was supposed to be a magical fix until some of their flaws started popping up. Fragile blades, deflections on quartering shots and loss of kinetic energy to open the blades. Rubber bands to retain them which I always found to be a royal PITA.

As time has passed more people are getting to see or read about some ofthe short comings of some designs. Also there has been an educating of the importance of bow/arrow tuning to the general public. Something some still don't know anything about or don't want to take the time to learn and do.

I guess they have their place, but not in my quiver. I take too much pride in being able to tune and taking the time to do so. Also to be considered is that because it takes energy tom open them up there needs to be more initial energy imparted to the arrow coming out of the bow. Well, I can't draw enough weight to muster that needed energy and wisely admit it to myself and anybody that asks. Therefore I have to, by necessity, shoot fixed (replaceable blade) heads out of respect for the animals I hunted.

For me there's one other aspect--- price. I am appalled at the prices most of these sell for and even more so the gullibility of people who would pay it. Only a couple years ago some were selling for $30 for a three pack when something like Wasp SST and Muzzys were selling for $25 for six. They both accomplish the same thing and for as much shooting at animals I do/did I just couldn't justify the cost of mechanicals. Take the Rage Titaniums for example. $80 for a pack of three? Who's kidding who?

On another note how about Lighted nocks? Guys will buy the cheapest arrows they can find and then pay $10 each for the cool looking lighted nock. I think people are somewhat stupid. I had a good coach years ago that taught me something. He said "The best shots you ever make will be the ones where you never see the arrow". In other words aim the bow and execute the shot. The arrow will be where the pin was when the bow went off.

OK, enough of my ranting.

Thermodude
05-11-2012, 06:05 PM
A hit it pretty well. They hit the same place as field points. Of course this is the WHY of the acceptsance of mechanicals in the first place. That was years ago. It was supposed to be a magical fix until some of their flaws started popping up. Fragile blades, deflections on quartering shots and loss of kinetic energy to open the blades. Rubber bands to retain them which I always found to be a royal PITA.

As time has passed more people are getting to see or read about some ofthe short comings of some designs. Also there has been an educating of the importance of bow/arrow tuning to the general public. Something some still don't know anything about or don't want to take the time to learn and do.

I guess they have their place, but not in my quiver. I take too much pride in being able to tune and taking the time to do so. Also to be considered is that because it takes energy tom open them up there needs to be more initial energy imparted to the arrow coming out of the bow. Well, I can't draw enough weight to muster that needed energy and wisely admit it to myself and anybody that asks. Therefore I have to, by necessity, shoot fixed (replaceable blade) heads out of respect for the animals I hunted.

For me there's one other aspect--- price. I am appalled at the prices most of these sell for and even more so the gullibility of people who would pay it. Only a couple years ago some were selling for $30 for a three pack when something like Wasp SST and Muzzys were selling for $25 for six. They both accomplish the same thing and for as much shooting at animals I do/did I just couldn't justify the cost of mechanicals. Take the Rage Titaniums for example. $80 for a pack of three? Who's kidding who?

On another note how about Lighted nocks? Guys will buy the cheapest arrows they can find and then pay $10 each for the cool looking lighted nock. I think people are somewhat stupid. I had a good coach years ago that taught me something. He said "The best shots you ever make will be the ones where you never see the arrow". In other words aim the bow and execute the shot. The arrow will be where the pin was when the bow went off.

OK, enough of my ranting.

Alot of good in this........the basics and satisfaction of tuning your own bow, in order to achieve perfect flight. I hope that this art isnt lost in the " I gotta have it fast and now generation". As for the lighted nock thing thats going on.................Im really impressed with the new Fusion Zeon vanes, I fletched up ah dozen the other day and took them outside, they really gather alot of light in the mornings and late evenings. They will be on my arrows this fall!

Lung Buster
05-15-2012, 08:18 AM
Hey thermo do you have a pic of those new vanes?

Thermodude
05-15-2012, 08:45 AM
Hey thermo do you have a pic of those new vanes?

Sure thing, Ill post them this evening when I get home.

Thermodude
05-15-2012, 04:30 PM
Hey thermo do you have a pic of those new vanes?

Posted over in the photo section!

Simple Life
05-15-2012, 04:37 PM
I use Grim Reaper's for deer,also shoot ST's and Montecs.I like the larger cutting diameter they give me.As for tuning,I have seen alot of people on AT not tune for fixed heads as well,just adjusting their sights.

Ford
05-15-2012, 07:46 PM
i dont have a ton of experience, but anyone consider wind deflection to be an issue with some of the larger fixed blade heads?
I like expandables for marginal shots that are to far back. Better chance of clipping the lungs. For some reason I dont miss deer to far forward, usually to far back. Just a thought

bob cooly
05-15-2012, 08:54 PM
Why risk the shot of your lifetime to something that (may) work. I take pleasure in tuning my bows to the place where the broadheads (Magnus 4 blade Buzzcuts). field points and bare shafts will all group to the same place at 20 yards. That said if I wanted a mechanical broadhead I wouldchoose the simplest design I could find. maybe the NAP Spitfire. As I am only pulling a 50lb bow I feel a good fixed blade cut on contact stuck in the right place is the only way to go. No broadhead will make up for poor shot placement, or as the instrictor said "make the first one count kid".

bfisher
05-15-2012, 09:06 PM
I wouln't say wind deflection. I'd use the term wind drift, which is probaly what you meant. If so, I'd say it depends on how far your hunting shots are. Under 30 yards it's going to take a pretty brisk wind to blow tem off course. I would say that if the bow isn't tuned well or you blow the hot and the arrow comes out of the bow ugly then those bigger blades are going to catch more air and can veer off course badly.

I learned a long time ago that vented blades can help with this, but a narrower cut head almost ensures good tunability and flight. It all just boils down to the surface area of the blades, alignment of the heads with the shaft and how well the bow is tuned. A head with a cutting width of 1 1/16" kills just as assuredly as a 2" width when put in the boiler. And usually that narrower head will be easier to tune, too.

Ford
05-16-2012, 05:40 PM
wind deflection came to mind because last year was my first year archery hunting, and on the first evening of the first day of the season; we had wind gusts of up to 40 mph, rain, and steady wind of at least 25mph.
Being the first day of the season I couldnt miss it, so I went duck hunting in the morning (perfect ducky weather), and went out archery in the evening. 8 minutes before legal shooting time ended a large 8 pt walked up behind my treestand, I was getting ready to get out of the stand when I saw him.
Missed the shot, not really due to wind, although it may have been a factor; but the low light ruined my shot, and I hit a limb that I didnt see. Anyway I always look back to that moment and wonder if the wind was to strong. With that said I wouldnt have made that shot with a mechanical or fixed.

madman350
05-17-2012, 06:50 PM
a overlooked aspect of them too is the sheer "potential" and "perception" of them. "potentially" all the advantages they have , at least from an advertising standpoint, make them at least to half the people that are interested in a new broadhead , psychologically certain that mechanicals are the way to go. obviously the vast majority of them work well on deer size game most of the time. once consumer confidence grows in a product that people "just have to have" or "becomes the next rage" ( no pun intended), then the consumer is at the mercy of the manufacturer and then they can charge whatever the market will bear (which is why many folks refuse to buy them). that in turn creates the perception of if it costs more it must be better which leads many folks into buying products like mechanicals because it makes them feel confident they own the very best they can buy or afford. on that thought this isnt declaring mechanicals inferior/superior , just explaining a different side of their success story.
It doesnt surprise me that a many of mechanicals biggest fans are shooting >$1,000 "big 3" bows, or toting around a 45$ bottle of doe in heat .

aldenjj
06-13-2012, 08:15 AM
I think the debate about mechanical broadheads will go on forever. A couple of things to consider. If your bow generates a minimum of 60lbs of kinetic energy, then a good mechanical could be a choice. but what distance are you going to shoot? If you are shootin at 35,40 yds. or even farther unless you still have around 60lbs. of energy, that is where you run into trouble.
I keep all my shots at 25yds. or less. I know my bow is generating about 70lbs. of energy....so a good mechanical will work. Last year I was shooting a Browning Bow.....slower, but Quiet .I think the energy was close to 58lbs. so I was pushing the envelope with mechanicals...but I wanted to try one anyways. it was an inexpensive Satellite 3 blade. I took a Button Buck(that I thought was a doe) at 7yds.
The broadhead blasted through at a quartering away angle . it came out through the front leg at the top section were it meets the shoulder. Left a large hole. The deer didn't go 20 yds. The arrow kept going!
if that shot had been any farther away I wouldn't have taken it. I doubt the broadhead would have had the energy to do that kind of damage.
Fast forward to today. 2011 Exile 285fps/70lbs. kenetic energy...swacker 100 grain broadhead....do I think it will kill just about any deer at 20yds.....you better believe it!!
I think if you do your homework, and your bow generates enough energy, mechanicals can work very well.
I have used fixed blades all of my life...successfully. Last year I tried a mechanical.This year "SWHACKER"

droppixel
06-13-2012, 08:51 AM
To give you an idea on all of this, last season hunted with my 07 Cheetah, which I can promise isn't anywhere near the 280 mark, in fact I have no idea where it is ... but my T3's blew right threw 2 doe exiting out the opposite shoulder at 20 yards and 25 yards. If you place the shot right, the mechanical will do the job every time while shooting any modern compound I believe. You may not get a pass, but if you hit vitals chances are you will be recovering the deer. My dad shot Rage for many seasons and never once had a pass through but took plenty of deer with his old Parker. He moved to T3 last year and dusted a doe at 30 clean pass! I think the big thing with the mechs is too not get too caught up in the huge cut diameter if you don't have the energy, that is where you will run into problems I think. I considered shooting old Steelheads with are 1 1/8 cut ...

Thermodude
06-13-2012, 09:56 AM
And the debate goes on as it will for years to come! Call me stubborn or old fashioned...." actually Im both "....:p but I just dont see any reason to shoot a mechanical. Even as well as they are made nowdays moving parts will and do fail, maybe not often but in time they will. Do my cut on contact work everytime? Well actually yes.........they dont have any choice they are solid and fixed to the end of an arrow. If for some reason they fail to do their job more than likely its my fault for not putting them were I shouldve.........JMO. Regardless of what we use the most important thing is making a good shot!

aldenjj
06-13-2012, 09:58 AM
You hit it right on the head Droppixel. Speed, and large cutting diameter aren't really the answer. energy is. That Browning that I used to hunt with had plenty of energy, but wasn't really fast. When I first bought it I could have set it up to be fairly fast ( 302) rated at 70lbs. I decided to have a little heavier arrow and larger broadhead . It originally was shooting about 245fps. at around 63lbs. of energy. a few years ago I changed arrows and broads, lighened up the draw(comes with getting older)...which slowed it down a little ,which in turn lowered the speed and kinetic energy, but it made it VERY QUIET. I had sacrificed some things to get it more comfortable to shoot and more quiet. Even after all of that, it still had enough power at close range for a mechanical to work.
I really think that with todays faster bows, that good mechanicals are hard to beat! The set up I have now with the new lighter,shorter,faster Martin Bow....should prove to be deadly with mechanicals. I only hope that this season I get a chance to try out the Swhacker Broadhead.

aldenjj
06-13-2012, 10:40 AM
I wouldn't say you were stubborn, or old fashion for sticking with fixed blades. they are what I have used every year until last year. I have quite a collection of mechanicals that I have bought over the years, but never used....because I wasn't sure if I could trust them to work right!
I decided to give the Satellite a try last year because it actually looked like a well made, inexpensive, but well made broadhead. I know plenty of people that have a particular fixed blade that they will always use. If that works, sticking with it is the safe smart bet!
My problem is that I like trying new and somtimes different things, arrows, broadheads, guns ammo etc.
For me it adds the unknown to a hunt......which creates more of a challenge.
2 years ago I tried a new fixed blade 100 grain by Eastman Outdoors. It failed miserably! Last year I tried a mechanical for the first time, it worked, I will try the Swhacker this year.....next year who knows.

CaptJJ
06-18-2012, 08:37 AM
I like big mechanicals(2" Hammerheads, see pic) for turkeys with a small vital area; for deer and bear small fixed blades have worked well but I wouldn't hesitate to use a mech like the Rocket Steelhead again.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/w203/lgsalmon/100_1652.jpg