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View Full Version : Bowstands of your preference.



foxman333
07-23-2012, 11:09 PM
This upcoming season is my second bow season. I see a lot of adds, for all these fancy bow stands, all of which costing over 100$ easily. The stand I hunted out of last year, was made by my father, and not bought out of a store. This year I used what I learned from my hunt last year, to design and build my own stand this year. I know its a little hefty, but it is sturdy and I know it will not be noisy, once hung in a tree. I was wondering if anyone had any input on bow stands. Personal favorites? Pros? Cons? 0r any tips they might have when it comes to constructing any tree-stands. I built my stand completely from scrap material from where I work. (If your city has a "loadmaster" garbage truck, chances are that I had something to do with it! Any input is appreciated!
All my stand needs is a seat, which is my next and final step, before hanging it in a tree!
6899

Bent Arrow
07-28-2012, 11:54 AM
Nice rig man. I just last year bought a Big Game ladder stand. My first store bought rig as I always built mine in the past. Sportsman"s Guide has some in their Guide Gear line that don't look too bad in the 50-75 dollar range in both hang on and ladder styles. Safety is #1 and the one you made looks bulletproof. Good work!:)

TEN RING
07-28-2012, 12:51 PM
myself I only use climbers I like to be mobile,The down side a little noisey

foxman333
07-28-2012, 06:36 PM
I have always liked the idea of a climber for hunting hardwoods, and have always wondered if they were super noisy. They look low impact, you dont have to set them up ahead of time, and have a low profile. That being said, do you ever have any problems with deer being spooked due to not being able to pre-set up the post?

Chip
07-28-2012, 06:57 PM
I have hunted from ladder stands and hang on's, I never used a climber. That being said I like ladder stands due to the ease of getting in and out, what can I say I'll be 50 this winter and a ladder is easier then sticks. I still will use both types though.

Bent Arrow
07-28-2012, 07:23 PM
I have hunted from ladder stands and hang on's, I never used a climber. That being said I like ladder stands due to the ease of getting in and out, what can I say I'll be 50 this winter and a ladder is easier then sticks. I still will use both types though.
Ditto on the ladder type, I'll be 47 this season. The knees ain't what they used to be, that's for sure.

TEN RING
07-28-2012, 07:30 PM
I have always liked the idea of a climber for hunting hardwoods, and have always wondered if they were super noisy. They look low impact, you dont have to set them up ahead of time, and have a low profile. That being said, do you ever have any problems with deer being spooked due to not being able to pre-set up the post?

I have set up and shot bucks with in a half hour of setting up

Skbengal
07-29-2012, 06:23 PM
Hi Foxman. I'm probably in the minority, but I'm a big fan of the tree saddle. They weigh about 4 lbs, are super quiet and safe, and they give you many more options when it comes to stand locations. You wear it in and out every trip so theft is not an issue. Someone could steal your steps, but that's cheap compared to a stand. I currently have enough steps to rig three locations(just one saddle). You can shoot virtually 360* and more importantly, you can set up in trees that lean. I've found plenty of nice hunting locations that would have been unusable with coventional stands. A couple of years ago I was setting up on an elk wallow. After I got up about 10', I was spotted by 3 whitetail does that were bedded down about 100 yds away. They watched me finish and then laid back down as though nothing was out of place. About 5 hrs later, my elk was on the ground, I was rigged out and on my way to the truck. It's nice when the heaviest thing you carry to rig up a stand, is your tree steps! I had hiked about a mile from the road. The saddle is also quite comfortable, I typically spend 6-7 hrs at a time no problem. You do need to practice shooting from it, but I found i got used to it quite quickly. Well, that's my two cents, everyone has their own likes and dislikes when it comes to equipment.

elkslayer4x5
07-30-2012, 10:31 AM
Is that one of those rope and plywood seat systems? Would'nt happen to have a photo, would you?

Skbengal
07-30-2012, 11:30 AM
ES4X5, no it isn't a rope and plywood system. It's kind of like a full harness with a built in leather seat. As your installing your steps it works like a linesman belt, then at the top you attach with a 2" nylon web lanyard. Your always 100% secure. I got caught in some high winds once, at 25' up the tree was waving back and forth about 2'(felt more like 6'). Took a few minutes to get used to but after a couple of hours the wind died down and I was able to finish my hunt. Don't think I would have been able to ride it out in a conventional stand. There are other companies that make similar harnesses(stands if you like), some with a hard seat built in. The one I use is the Trophyline tree saddle. I believe I paid $220 for it, and another $90 for sixty steps. Pretty cheap compared to buying three stands. Here's the link:http://trophylineusa.com/products.php

foxman333
07-30-2012, 08:42 PM
How comfortable is that harness-stand? If you plan on spending all afternoon in it, you don't have to worry about your legs going numb or anything like that? I like the idea for mobility reasons. What about equipment storage? How do you do store any equipment you might have, while up in your stand? I usually don't hook my bow up, I like to have it in my hand (at least when my set up allows for it). But the stand is definitely something I will look into.

Skbengal
07-31-2012, 06:29 PM
Foxman. I find it's very comfortable, never had a problem with legs or butt going numb. While in the saddle you can straddle the tree, stretch your legs straight out, or prop your knees against the tree. The only thing that ever causes any discomfort is when you prop your knees against the tree for too long, but you can wear knee pads if you like. I just swing to a different position, practice drawing my bow, ranging, etc, in all directions. Like I said 6-7 hrs is not a problem(you can even sleep in it although I've never tried it. But you certainly wouldn't fall out!). Mine has a 3 compartment pouch for my tether, belt, and one with enough room for a couple of calls, a rangefinder,rattle bag, and my knife. There are some 2" nylon web loops sewn into the top of the seat but after attaching the pouch, only one or two are practical to use. They do make accessory pouches and such for the saddle, but I haven't needed any. When going out to set up I use a fanny pack that holds 20 steps, two bow hangers,hoisting rope, and my saw. Once I'm set up, I hang the fanny pack out of the way and I'm good to go. Note; anything you wear on your belt will have to be moved to the front of your body, or carried elsewhere (ei. knife).

B4L Okie
08-13-2012, 08:07 PM
How much do you have to worry about a broadhead getting near that strap? Crossing over from one side to other is ur nocked arrow clear? Ever hear of anyone cutting it and falling?

Skbengal
08-14-2012, 10:32 PM
B4L, virtually no chance of cutting the strap. The strap is 2" nylon webbing, comes from just above your waist upwards to the tree. Your body is only 18'' - 30" from the tree, depending on your posture. Your bow arm is off to the side. You would literally have to pull the bow or arrow over your head or shoulder, with the broadhead pointing down, to cut the strap. BTW, you don't crossover from side to side. You move around the tree to get the shot angle you need. You can move about 200* around the tree, to the left or right, but you can also twist in the saddle and shoot directly behind you. It looks like it might be a little awkward, but it's actually a comfortable, easy shot. You can easily shoot 360*.