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droppixel
09-20-2012, 03:19 PM
I just can't wrap my head around this. Guys that go out and drop a fortune on a bow and they can't tune it themselves? They have to send it off to someone or go to a shop to have them set it all up and tune it for them. Unreal. End rant.

Hutch~n~Son Archery
09-20-2012, 03:39 PM
Okay Dp, stop your rantings. You'll put me out of business. :p I have a few bows down stairs that the owners don't have a clue how to tune one bit:p so they hand them to me.




Hutch:cool:

droppixel
09-20-2012, 04:12 PM
I get it, but some people should take some steps to at least learning some of the stuff themselves. This was prompted by "Who should I send a Hoyt To?"

Really dude, you buy a Hoyt and you can't do anything yourself ... come on man.

Hutch~n~Son Archery
09-20-2012, 04:14 PM
Ha! that's the bow I have down stairs. Not! But it is a Hoyt.



Yuck!!!!




Hutch:cool:

droppixel
09-20-2012, 06:50 PM
Okay Dp, stop your rantings. You'll put me out of business. :p I have a few bows down stairs that the owners don't have a clue how to tune one bit:p so they hand them to me.




Hutch:cool:

Sounds like a typical big 3 owner ... go out and spend a ton on a bow because it is the cool thing to do and you have no clue how it operates ... hi5

last comment ;)

typically8
09-20-2012, 10:02 PM
I am no newbie to archery but I must admit to occasionally having to go to the pro shop. It wasn't until the last couple of years that I have become more self sufficient. I did not have a mentor to show me the ins and outs of tuning. If a newbie does not have a go to guy, I would suggest getting the book Tuning & Silencing Your Bowhunting Shooting System by Larry Wise. It has been very useful to me. I also ask alot of questions when I get around fellow archers. Now if I could just get a decent rest.

Hutch~n~Son Archery
09-21-2012, 03:41 AM
Sounds like a typical big 3 owner ... go out and spend a ton on a bow because it is the cool thing to do and you have no clue how it operates ... hi5

last comment ;)
Yeah but I like their Money:rolleyes:





Hutch:cool:

elkslayer4x5
09-21-2012, 07:53 AM
I just can't wrap my head around this. Guys that go out and drop a fortune on a bow and they can't tune it themselves? They have to send it off to someone or go to a shop to have them set it all up and tune it for them. Unreal. End rant.

Could you tune your bow when you first came to this site Ryan? I know that I had no clue, in fact I got my Slayer and it had some cam lean, a really simple thing on a X rigged bow, but I came to this site and began asking questions and learning. Been here ever since, and have no fear of taking a bow apart if need be. With what I've learned from guys on this site, I've super tuned all the grandkids bows, and every bow that I've had since. Most guys don't know much more than " who do I send my bow to get it supertuned?" Just read the posts on AT, almost every thing you'll read is an echo from someone else. We get spoiled here, guys here take the time to explain what and why and we take the time to read and understand what we are reading. :)

ElkSlayer
09-21-2012, 10:28 AM
Yep just put in a new set of spark plugs, she running hot now.... oh wait thats the truck

bfisher
09-21-2012, 06:35 PM
I;m reading some good converstaions here. You guys get along well, and what's more learn from one another. I feel the same way about guys buying bows and don't even know how to adjust the draw weight let alone something more "complicated", like slide their peep up or down the string to align it to their eye. To me it's sad, not that they don't know anything, but makes me wonder who is guiding these people with the equipment choices.

In all my years of shooting, hunting and competitive shooting I think the one biggest mistake people make is doing all their practice in their back yard. For one thing it's boring and another is that chances to learn anything are remote unless a person has some sort of mechanical aptitude and desire to learn. I always adize people to do some homework and find a local archery club to join. Get involved, do some 3D or target shooting and learn from some of the better shooters who I can almost guarantee are willing to "pass it on", just like I do today.

Part of learning how to work on bows is not just doing it to save money. It's just the idea of learning how these things work so you can recognize when something changes you can undeerstand what's causing problems. Even if you can't fix it at least you'll know whether it's something simple or something requiring the attention of the pro shop. One other good thing is that you'll have some idea of whether your bow shop is doin right by you or just blowing smoke up your behind and ripping your wallet apart.

daiwateampenn
09-23-2012, 11:38 PM
seriously when i first started archery at the archery range, where you pay and have a wooden bow and a coach to teach you about shooting.
I never though so much of a bow knowledge can go so deep under.
Fletcher, bow press, vanes, arrow tips, knocks, inserts, cutter... so and so...

at first, definately we only think a bow and a few arrow will get to a happy shooting.

THEN starting to pickup and compound bow to enjoy this sport. i realize there is so many things to learn, and also equipment to buy along learning and educating myself.

Now i end up bunch of stuff in the closet that to support shooting, beside the bow.
Lucky i dont built my own string and cable. this one leave to Hutch~n~Son to figure it out.

So no suprise, where there is ppl, have the $$$ and yet to be educated in archery, they send their bow for tuning, and anything, and as time goes by, they will one day knows, oooh... it just that easy to do it....

droppixel
09-27-2012, 01:28 PM
I know I said I wouldn't comment on this anymore, but case in point ... pay attention to the signature.

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1858466

daiwateampenn
09-27-2012, 07:42 PM
I know I said I wouldn't comment on this anymore, but case in point ... pay attention to the signature.

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1858466

:eek: blink blink....

Arrow Splitter
09-28-2012, 06:09 PM
I know I said I wouldn't comment on this anymore, but case in point ... pay attention to the signature.

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1858466You just ruined this thread!!:D LOL

Seriously, I don't have anything against those that buy more expensive bows, but everyone could save themselves money by doing most of the work on their bows themselves.

A.S

bfisher
09-28-2012, 08:43 PM
I always wonder who they are geting their advice from. They could just as easily buy a $400 bow and spend the rest of that hard earned cash on a good coach. Join an archery club and start paying attention to the better target shooters who are usually more than glad to pass along things they've learned. Some don't know how to work on a bow and some of those don't want to learn.

There are a couple sayings I like to repeat. A man who never tried anything never made a mistake. And a man who never made a mistake never learned anything. In both cases it's usually out of fear of failure or laziness.

Hutch~n~Son Archery
09-29-2012, 06:35 AM
Well in the long run it doesn't matter about the expense you spend on a bow. If you don't know how to work on a bow you'll need someone who can. I have a guy that is coming over this after noon to have a d loop put on one bow and a module put in another bow. He's a Machinist/Spay booth painter. So you know he can do it or figure it out, but chooses not too. I also have another guy who doesn't touch his bow except to shoot it. He's willing to slap $100 to $200 at me and say fix it. He's a Meat cutter and has no time so it's easier to send it out. Also working on bows is not as easy as some think. There are a lot of quirks and details you have to remember. I have had one guy who did all his own work on his bow. Well lets just say thought he did what was right. But in the long run we straightened it out for him and guided him on his way. I truly believe you can learn how to do anything if you want but some don't want. The best place to start if you not mechanically inclined is here. I have learned a lot off this forum. A good reference book is Nuts and bolts http://archeryhistory.com/archerytalk/The_Nuts&Bolts_of_Archery.pdf


Hutch:cool:

droppixel
09-29-2012, 12:22 PM
A d-loop!? ffs man! I can understand the module if he doesn't have a press and it isn't an adjustable. Don't get me wrong - take their money and run Bill ... but I just can't get past this. Should have at least a general idea of how things work so if something breaks or goes wonky and you are out on a trip and no where near a shop, you can at least get it functioning again. Oh well.

daiwateampenn
09-30-2012, 11:01 PM
Should have at least a general idea of how things work so if something breaks or goes wonky and you are out on a trip and no where near a shop, you can at least get it functioning again. Oh well.

they will come to the extent searching, and posting "Im looking for backup bow price range from blah blah blah to blah blah blah... incase my bow fail while hunting" any good recommendation???.

so they will have backup bow instead of learning.:)

Hutch~n~Son Archery
10-01-2012, 04:11 AM
Quite frankly they usually have one or two back up bows. He brings in all three and has my go through all of them then he is all set to hunt the year. His time is very limited. Less time working on a bow more time in the field.





Hutch:cool:

bob cooly
10-01-2012, 07:31 AM
One more reason to buy a Martin Bow, they are the easiest bows to break down for maintainence of any kind. I hope Martin will continue to build bows in the future that someone can work on without alot of expensive tools, like a bow press. Esp. if you live 2hrs or more from a (Proshop).