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View Full Version : ATA,how long is too long?



Dale817
05-16-2013, 06:16 PM
Going over my Pantera today,the ATA is an 1/8" too long which ain't too bad I guess.but it got me to thinking,what is too long?and what do you add twists to? The string or the cable or both? Thanks Dale

Arrow Splitter
05-16-2013, 06:23 PM
Up to about a 1/4" for ATA. I personally wouldn't allow mine to be a 1/4" off, but that's me. When twisting, I believe it is a 4 to 1 ratio. Four twists in the cable(s) and one in the string.

A.S

Dale817
05-16-2013, 06:35 PM
Thanks A.S. Does it make a difference if it's a single cam or dual cams? As far as the 4to1 ratio is concerned,My Pantera is the Fury XT single cam

Arrow Splitter
05-16-2013, 07:09 PM
Thanks A.S. Does it make a difference if it's a single cam or dual cams? As far as the 4to1 ratio is concerned,My Pantera is the Fury XT single cam

No. On a hybrid you definitely have to twist the cables equally, or your cam timing will be off.

A.S

bfisher
05-17-2013, 08:48 AM
Here's something you can do prior to any twisting. If a right handed bow, if the draw length and draw weight is as you like it, draw two lines on the left side of the cam where it passes through the limb fork; both if it's a dual cam. Add about 5 twists to each cable and check your lines. Twisting the cables will make the draw length a little longer. If necessary add some twists to the string and then check the A2A measurement. Work back and forth with this till you get the desired results. When you're done check the A2A and draw weight. It wouldn't hurt to measure the draw length prior and after if you have a draw board. You can also use the draw board to check cam synch, too.

I just did this with a Razor's Edge yesterday and to reduce the A2A 1/4" it took 10 twists in each cable, but I also didn't twist the string as I was trying to increase the draw weight. Twisting just the cables raises draw weight while twisting the string decreases it.

Sonny Thomas
05-18-2013, 09:16 AM
What I look for is the bow making listed max draw weight. At one time the industry standard was said to me (another company) that +/- 3/8" was a given tolerance. I have yet to find a bow that much off.

Max draw weight present, I'd do like Barry noted. Sort of give and take process, but it works.

Hutch~n~Son Archery
05-18-2013, 07:13 PM
What I look for is the bow making listed max draw weight. At one time the industry standard was said to me (another company) that +/- 3/8" was a given tolerance. I have yet to find a bow that much off.

Max draw weight present, I'd do like Barry noted. Sort of give and take process, but it works.

x2 what he said;)



Hutch:cool:

HawgEnvy
05-19-2013, 07:16 AM
I may be the odd man out on this, but I try to get my specs dead on to manufacturer's listed specs and shoot whatever DW feels best on that particular bow. I don't have access to a draw board or a scale, so I go by feel and keep my measurements(peep to kisser to nock) recorded so i can get them set up the same if I change something.

Sonny Thomas
05-19-2013, 08:17 AM
I may be the odd man out on this, but I try to get my specs dead on to manufacturer's listed specs and shoot whatever DW feels best on that particular bow. I don't have access to a draw board or a scale, so I go by feel and keep my measurements(peep to kisser to nock) recorded so i can get them set up the same if I change something.

Nothng wrong with this. However, a draw board is not necessary and any weight scale that will read 100 pounds will work.

For a draw board many use nothing more than a hook in the ceiling. I have a rope hanging from ceiling with a "S" hook - hook at nocking point and draw down on bow - use care. I also have a tape measure with loop on the end. This goes on the "S" hook - pull out and let hang - weight it if necessary to keep it straight. So, you can check timing and draw length.

Years back I used a bathroom scale and a shortened notched broom handle. Kind of ungainly, but worked. Nock broom handled much like a arrow. Tip of broom handle on scale and push bow down to read draw weight.

Out in my garage I have a standard 110 weight scale with "S" hook hanging from ceiling. Hook at nocking point, I draw down bow to read draw weight.

Although we have a wench set up at the shop, we still have a scale hanging from the ceiling with a steel tape measure. Here, this set up can be used to check timing, check draw weight and letoff, and measure draw length. It gets used more than the fancy wench thingie.