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carl365
07-04-2013, 03:46 PM
Among the Easton aluminum arrows, should a certain spine number be all the same regardless of the grade? (X7, Platinum, Jazz) Reason being, I don't want to use expensive arrows in the public field bales here, their trash. So I want a beater set and a better set like the X7's to use at well maintained ranges.

Thanks,
Carl

Sonny Thomas
07-04-2013, 05:21 PM
Spine is spine. Arrow grade/model is usually straightness.....

carl365
07-04-2013, 06:59 PM
Spine is spine. Arrow grade/model is usually straightness.....

Thanks Sonny Thomas, I wanna get two sets, something like Jazz for the trash bales and another better set but with the same shooting characteristics.

Happy 4th!
Carl

bfisher
07-04-2013, 07:12 PM
Spine is spine, just as Sonny says, but that's not the whole story. You have to have the same diameter and weight. I assume you know of this, too, but just making sure.

otisT
07-05-2013, 01:46 AM
I THINK; didn't I read somewhere that many companies, maybe all, grade and sort their arrows by straightness then stick a name on them? Like made up arrow company Flying B's - FB - will have their top line arrows of .001 straightness tolerance sorted out and sold for a premium price; call 'em FB 1s, then they have say FB 3s and FB 6s at much lower prices. So, you could theoretically be shooting the same basic arrow for perhaps half the price. Personally, I doubt many archers can shoot good enough to tell the difference. Hmmmm, maybe I am just speaking for myself there!!.... o

bfisher
07-05-2013, 06:24 AM
You bring up a good point. For instance, in the case of Gold Tip Ultralites, which I shoot, there are Pro series which have a straightness of .001. Then there are regular Ultralites what are .003. Then there are Ultralite Entradas which are .006. Each with a different price. They all comes off the same mandrel and are sorted according to straightness and weight. The Pros cost about $120/doz for shafts whereas the Entradas cost about half that. Of course there are maybe slightly more variances in spine deviation and weight within a dozen, but you are correct that most people wouldn't be able to shoot well enough to tell the difference, so why spend the extra money.

What's more, depending on how long you need the shaft, you could cut 2" off the nock end and the rest off the point end, removing some of the UN-straightness. Start with a .006 shaft and conceivably end up with something closer to .003. And for those who don't know it .003" is about the thickness of a piece of paper---not very much.

And another thing. You often read about getting shafts that won't group with the rest of the dozen (fliers). While this is true to some extent I still believe that in many cases it's not the shaft itself. It does happen, but I think in most cases it's not a flier but an errant shot on the part of the shooter.

Sonny Thomas
07-05-2013, 07:04 AM
What Barry has above... Aluminum arrows are made different, no seam. Carbon arrows of make/model, as in CXL 150 or 250 or 350, do come off the same mandrel (internal mold), just sorted for weight and straightness.

I'm not so sure of cutting X amount off both ends creates a straighter arrow. I just went through this not to long ago with the original Harvest Time Archery arrows, HT3s. Something was wrong and when I checked a few of the dozen in question they looked horrible, as much as .012" run out. Seems arrow companies evidently check from what is deemed dead center. Checked by Muddy Outdoors all the arrows I checked were checked half what I found - .012" were said to be .006". Further investigation proved the same thing with Carbon Express and PSE. So the most out of tolerance may be only on one end. Who's to know unless you have a long center lathe and traveling indicator?

And all carbon arrows do have a seam. Look inside the shaft. Look for a burnished or polished area/line. This is the seam of the overlap of build and said to be the stiffest of the arrow. I've built arrow using the seam for quite sometime. Barry might know of my "passed the test" procedure. All my arrows must hit the X ring of a NFAA 20 yard indoor target from 30 yards. I've yet to have one fail the test. This I have done with Victory X Ringers and X Killers, Carbon Express CXL 150s and 250s, and HTA HT3s from both Harvest Time Archery and Muddy Outdoors.

I've asked all over and no one really has a answer other than the stiffest of the arrow should be either straight up or straight down with use of mechanical release. Which brings up another question; What about finger shooters? Archer's paradox?

carl365
07-05-2013, 10:11 AM
[QUOTE=Sonny Thomas;105720What about finger shooters? Archer's paradox?[/QUOTE]

Thanks all for the detailed responses. Since I've added recurve to my shooting, the arrow characteristics has become a critical issue it seems with tuning.

Carl