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View Full Version : Tork Issues on a 07 Cheetah



MarkFrantz
09-09-2008, 09:35 PM
I have a 1 year old Cheetah , 29'' Draw set @ 66 lbs , when i draw i can twist the sh!t out of the riser , Is it mostly because of the 30'' ATA ? to tell ya the truth i never noticed it as bad till i was shooting my Buddys Hoyt Katera and its solid , But any ways is there a cure for this ?

Aim4gold
09-10-2008, 05:25 AM
Radical Reflexed risers are prone to this. Consistant hand position without grasping the riser is the only cure I know of.

bfisher
09-10-2008, 10:02 AM
It's really a combination of things. Riser geometry, as mentioned, is one of them. Low holding weight is probably the biggest contributor however. There's is no weight on the string at full draw thanks to the 80% letoff. Therefore you can move your ahdn, twists your wrist or any number of things and induce torque. It's going to be the same with any similar bow with high letoff.

This is one of the major reasons good target shooters prefer to shoot a max of 65%, and even prefer 50% when they can get them. Without the torque everything tends to hold in a straight line at full draw.

MarkFrantz
09-10-2008, 07:54 PM
It's really a combination of things. Riser geometry, as mentioned, is one of them. Low holding weight is probably the biggest contributor however. There's is no weight on the string at full draw thanks to the 80% letoff. Therefore you can move your ahdn, twists your wrist or any number of things and induce torque. It's going to be the same with any similar bow with high letoff.

This is one of the major reasons good target shooters prefer to shoot a max of 65%, and even prefer 50% when they can get them. Without the torque everything tends to hold in a straight line at full draw.

Thats what i thought Barry , it really didnt bother me before , i was just playing around twisting it at full draw to see how much it really had and its alot , but as i shoot i dont have any tork I always hold my grip with my thumb and index finger wraped around it and touching the tips of each other , and the others pointing straight out , I can feel where the sweet spot is in it , thats all that matters i guess .

bfisher
09-10-2008, 08:28 PM
Don't hold your other fingers out in a stiff manner. Just let the whole hand relax. The hand should be angled out at about 45 degrees with the grip on the meat of the thumb.

Here is another way to explain how to grip (or not grip) a bow. For a better word let's call it hand position. Wait a minute!!!!

Alec and Simon. You guys paying attention????

OK, let's go. Take your left arm and extend it out to your side and point at something. Anything. Just do it naturally. If you notice your hand is not vertical but angled. Correct??? That's what you are looking for. Something that feels natural and relaxed, with emphasis on relaxed.

Now, holding that arm out there, bend your arm only at the elbow bringing your hand back toward your body. Your hand should come almost directly back into your chest.

If this is what you have then your hand and arm are correctly positioned in the bow's grip.

If you bend the elbow and your hand goes up in the air then this is "wrong, wrong, wrong". BAAAAAd hand position.

So get the "good" hand position and let the fingers just relax.

MarkFrantz
09-10-2008, 09:20 PM
Even though i've been shooting for years on a regular basis , it surely doesnt hurt to take some advice , I just drew back and held the bow as free as i could at the grip and it feels good , Now i never do grip it tight what so ever so i'm gonna shoot that way from now on , i was just amazed with the Hoyt Katera you actually had to force the riser to twist at full draw , then i picked up my Cheetah and it felt so sloppy , i was dissapointed .

Montalaar
09-11-2008, 02:28 AM
I am here Barry. I just like to read your answers as they are so full of experience. ;)

In fact it was very amusing to read your description of the right hand position.

bfisher
09-11-2008, 07:53 AM
Yeah, although I was taught 30 years ago how to NOT grip a bow I just learned the "bending at the elbow" thing a couple years ago when I took a NAA instructor course. It involved mostly recurves, but form is form. Many similarities between bows.