PDA

View Full Version : New release



flintforever
10-07-2008, 03:27 PM
I am going to try a new release the tru-ball hunter thumb trigger
I seem to have a bad habit after a few arrow at the target I find myself punching the trigger on a tru-flight strap release

flintforever
10-08-2008, 03:01 PM
what a difference with the new release
My average group before at 30 yards 5" now 2"
I find I can't punch the trigger with the thumb release and get a better follow threw

Aim4gold
10-09-2008, 07:41 PM
I don't want to rain on your parade - punching one release, change releases and no punching for a while, sooner or later you start punching that this one too.

Change is good, but not the cure

One solution, learn back tension and you will stop punching :)

bfisher
10-10-2008, 10:12 AM
Glad it's working for you. However, as mentioned, you need to change the way your mind think and execute with back tension and just concentrate on aiming.

What you were experiencing is one of the pitfalls of an index-finger release. Very few people learn to shoot them correctly. The index finger is just too sensitive and more so near the figer tip where most people shoot them. A couple ways to help with it is to shorten the release till it is near the second finger joint at full draw. Then you can wrap your finger around the trigger and lay into it with back tension. Another way is to not use the index finger at all. Use the middle finger instead. Kind of odd at first, but with practice it becomes second nature.

flintforever
10-10-2008, 12:25 PM
bfisher:I find that statement so true with a finger trigger release.
The back tension follow threw is not there on the trigger release I find the pro-diamond works better then the wrist strap trigger style

bfisher
10-10-2008, 05:42 PM
bfisher:I find that statement so true with a finger trigger release.
The back tension follow threw is not there on the trigger release I find the pro-diamond works better then the wrist strap trigger style

As I stated, the problem is not necessarily the type of release, but the way people prefer to shoot them. And this is not to say that people deliberately shoot them incorrectly. Most don't know how to properly shoot a release because they relate a trigger as being shot just like a gun. Of course, we all know that you don't shoot a gun with back tension.

Giving an example, I presently shoot a rope release with the roper directly under and against the nock. In fact, with very few exceptions this is what I ave always shot, dating back to the mid 70's when I shot a lot of field and target archery.

A year or so ago I tried shooting a loop on the string to see if I'd like it and to see if they really are the cat's meow like most young guys today say. The problem is I could not find a release short enough. Caliper head just didn't get it. Most are plain junk anyway. I wwent so far as to try a Short&Sweet which attaches to the wrist strap with a cord (nylon rope). Even with the cord as short as I could get it, when I hooked it up and drew the bow the head stretched too far forward for me to get my finger around the trigger like I wanted.

So needless to say, the release went back to the shop and the loop went kaput. I find the rope on my release works just fine. I can hook it up in about 2 seconds without even looking. After time it takes a natural bend that wraps about half way around the string. I've never had enough nock-pinch to force the arrow off the string. I've been using the same rope for over 8 years and it shows very little fraying (starting to) and never wore out a serving yet either. Most of the virtues of a loop without some of the hassles. This is what works for me.

Just for what it's worth I use a Cascade model 8 with Thumb Relax mode. I have 3 of them.