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View Full Version : New to bowhunting and archery could use some advice



Snohunt
08-19-2009, 11:04 PM
Hello,

I recently purchased the saber package that includes everything you need to get started. Cool part was it was a gift from my wife.. so happy about that. Always wanted to get into bow hunting. Anyway, the unit itself looks fantastic and after doing some research seems like a real nice bow.

My question is this.. my wife ordered the bow with a 60# draw weight. I am thinking I should have got the 70# draw weight to get the advertised speed. Is my current bow adjustable? Any new advice for a newby would also be appreciated.

Thanks!

Montalaar
08-19-2009, 11:48 PM
If it was ordered with 60# then you can adjust it 15# downwards. That means you can adjust it from 45# - 60# (5 turns in the set screws but you can read this yourself in the bow manual).

bfisher
08-20-2009, 07:32 AM
Couple things. #1, you aren't going to get the advertised speed, even with 70# limbs because you aren't going to be shooting the bow at IBO specs in the first place. That means 70#, 30" draw, and 350 grain arrow, nothing on the string.

2nd, you can get pretty similar speed at 60# as at 70# if you do your homework and shoot a comparably lighter arrow. In other words, at 5gr per pound of draw weight in both cases.

The only thing you'll lose is a certain amount of kinetic energy, which isn't as important as some people think. That 60# with a properly spined arrow is plenty for hunting anything in North America and beyond so don't let your testosterone get the best of you. You are much better off to be able to shoot the bow well and accurately, being able to practice more and longer to achieve that accuracy.

The only thing 70# will do over the long haul is destroy your shoulders. In other words, take about 10 years off your shooting time.

Dave308
08-20-2009, 07:58 AM
Couple things. #1, you aren't going to get the advertised speed, even with 70# limbs because you aren't going to be shooting the bow at IBO specs in the first place. That means 70#, 30" draw, and 350 grain arrow, nothing on the string.

2nd, you can get pretty similar speed at 60# as at 70# if you do your homework and shoot a comparably lighter arrow. In other words, at 5gr per pound of draw weight in both cases.

The only thing you'll lose is a certain amount of kinetic energy, which isn't as important as some people think. That 60# with a properly spined arrow is plenty for hunting anything in North America and beyond so don't let your testosterone get the best of you. You are much better off to be able to shoot the bow well and accurately, being able to practice more and longer to achieve that accuracy.

The only thing 70# will do over the long haul is destroy your shoulders. In other words, take about 10 years off your shooting time.



You hit the nail on the head there :(

Snohunt
08-20-2009, 10:36 AM
Thank you, I appreciate the advice.

bubbacrabb
08-20-2009, 03:49 PM
Im not saying your wrong, but I am a very physically fit guy, and I dont think there would be any reason for me to shoot 60 if Im shooting 70# with no problem. Plus I am 27 years old. I think there are a lot of different factors. I wouldnt go as far to say that you will take time out of your bow hunting life. I always was taught if you can easily pull it back with no stuggle at all, and keep it steady you are good. So I guess to each his own. I have seen plenty of deer killed at 40-50-60-70 lbs. Just hit her threw the boiler room and youre going to kill the deer. Dont sweat speed. Sweat accuracy. Lol you ask ten different bow hunters ten different questions you get ten different answers, lol. Atleast most of us on here can agree Martin makes one heck of a bow on a working mans budget, good luck in the woods fellas!