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View Full Version : how far to tighten my limbs??



ezbite
11-23-2009, 08:06 PM
had my guy at the archery shop pull my Firecat on the scale today and its exactly at 70#'s, ive got about one full turn till the limbs touch the riser, i mentioned that i could get maybe 73, maybe 74 out of it and he told me to leave it where its at. he said theres got to be some room for cushion and i should not bottom the limbs. now ive been reading that bows preform best when at their highest setting, im guessing my highest setting would be when the limb bolts are cranked down, what do you guys think?? should i leave it or give it the exrat turn?

RogerSr
11-23-2009, 08:44 PM
Bows preform best at or near their max, but yes you will get a little more by turning the limb bolts all the way down, but it's up to you it's no big deal either way, you won't gain that much.

ezbite
11-23-2009, 09:59 PM
i remember when we got it out of the box and cut it out of the plastic, the bolts were all the way in. i had him back them out while we set it up and just left it there after that. just yesterday is when i cranker her to 70#. i might have to call the factory. i dont think they'd send me a bow maxed out if it wasnt suppost to be maxed out.

RogerSr
11-23-2009, 10:32 PM
Yes it is sup-post to be maxed out, most people keep their limb bolts all the way down, and I do some times. but you don't have to, it works fine both ways.

bfisher
11-24-2009, 09:29 AM
There's no harm in cranking the bolts all the way in, but not if it's going to be more weight than you can accurately handle. Shoot your bow without struggling. It's a game of accuracy, not brawn. Poundage is just a number that guys stick in their heads. They just have to shoot the most they can. What they don't realize is that very often they can shoot far better with 10# less than they think they have to have.

A ton of speed or a ton of kinetic energy is totally wasted if you can't put every shot where you intend it to go. The old saying "A fast miss is still a miss" applies.

As far as a bow performing it's best bottomed out? This is true to an extent. What people fail to realize is that bows perform at a higher percentage of efficiency bottomed out. It's a very very slight "higher percentage". One that no shooter can measure, see, or feel.

Say you have a 70# bow that has an efficiency of 80%. That means that 80% of the stored energy in the bow is used to propel the arrow. The rest gets absorbed by the bow in the form of vibration, friction, and noise.

That same bow turned down to 65# may produce something like 78.8% efficiency. You'll never see it, but you will probably be able to see a marked difference in how well you can shoot the bow.

Why do you think most target shooters shoot bows somewhere between 45# and 55#. Those bows will be longer and heavier, too. It's because they know that to achieve the utmost in accuracy they don't need to strain their bodies.

Think about it. Make archery fun and easy. It's not a weight lifting competition.

brushrat
11-24-2009, 09:48 AM
There's no harm in cranking the bolts all the way in, but not if it's going to be more weight than you can accurately handle. Shoot your bow without struggling. It's a game of accuracy, not brawn. Poundage is just a number that guys stick in their heads. They just have to shoot the most they can. What they don't realize is that very often they can shoot far better with 10# less than they think they have to have.

A ton of speed or a ton of kinetic energy is totally wasted if you can't put every shot where you intend it to go. The old saying "A fast miss is still a miss" applies.

As far as a bow performing it's best bottomed out? This is true to an extent. What people fail to realize is that bows perform at a higher percentage of efficiency bottomed out. It's a very very slight "higher percentage". One that no shooter can measure, see, or feel.

Say you have a 70# bow that has an efficiency of 80%. That means that 80% of the stored energy in the bow is used to propel the arrow. The rest gets absorbed by the bow in the form of vibration, friction, and noise.

That same bow turned down to 65# may produce something like 78.8% efficiency. You'll never see it, but you will probably be able to see a marked difference in how well you can shoot the bow.

Why do you think most target shooters shoot bows somewhere between 45# and 55#. Those bows will be longer and heavier, too. It's because they know that to achieve the utmost in accuracy they don't need to strain their bodies.

Think about it. Make archery fun and easy. It's not a weight lifting competition.

Well put Bfisher. A side benefit to that is that you maybe able to enjoy archery well into your golden years.:):)

Spiker
11-24-2009, 04:03 PM
...what Barry said.

And just in my experience - a well tuned bow will almost never end up at an even 50#,60#,70#...
Max draw weight and tiller is just as essential to 'tune in' as all the other aspects (centershot, nock point, rest timing if yer using a drop-away, etc...)
No two arrows and no two people shoot the same out of the same bow so you gotta adjust it all. One of my '60#' bows shoots best at 63#, the other one shoots best at 58#.

just my 2 cent.