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View Full Version : Which bow to buy, please help



duffy
04-23-2010, 02:45 PM
Hello

i am new to this forum and new to martin archery, a few people at my archery club own martin bows, and i was about to order a moab but cannot do that as cant find any.

is it right that the firecat has the same riser design, just different cams a bit more agressive i hear, ie if pulling 60lb firecat feels like pulling 70lb moab?

what bow should i get, contemplating with rytera alien x (for field archery is this 1 the smaller bow they do)

moab - but cant get hold of.

firecat which one. tr1 tr2 or the pro-x

the above is what i am interested in, any help would be much appreciated, i am from the uk so only know of a few places that stock martin bows.

bfisher
04-23-2010, 06:44 PM
The FireCat TR1 is the replacement for the Moab. It's just about the same bow. That being said, if you are interested in a serious "field" bow I wold choose something with a longer A2A. A 32" bow might be nice for the hunting woods, but is not conducive to ultimate accuracy needed for field shooting. Same can be said for the Alien X. An S4 or the new ShadowCat would be better choices. Even the Alien Z, at 36", would be better, but still not a serious target bow.

As for comparing cams? Don't. Ive had both the Moab and the FireCat (Cat cams) and compared them using a chronograph. The harder drawing Cat cam will produce the same speed as a M2Pro cam, but at about 8# less draw weight.

I don't know what draw weight you prefer for field, but let's assume about 55# with a Moab or TR1. You can get the same speed with a TR2, but only draw about 47#. That itself makes the harder drawing cam seem less hard, so comparing two bows at equal draw weight is not always the right answer.

bb11
05-14-2010, 08:53 AM
Barry:

Do you feel that for shootablility, the peaks and valleys in a draw cycle are as important as the draw weight? For example in my case I think that for me a peak earlier on in the cycle is better as that is where my strenght is greatest, rather than at the end of the cycle.

Does that make sense?

If so, do you think the mpro single cam has an earleir peak than the Cat II duo cam? Is so does that render the mpro a bit "smoother."

Thanks,
Bruce

oncechance
05-14-2010, 12:57 PM
The bow of choice, from a few people that I talked to, was the MOAB. It was a good all-around bow for 3-D and hunting. When I went to look for one to order, I could not find one, thus I ran across the TR1. It is the same bow but with new cams and limbs. I've been very happy with this bow and it has performed well during the 3-D outings that I have attended. It is no speed freak but shoots fast enough for me.

bfisher
05-14-2010, 07:24 PM
Barry:

Do you feel that for shootablility, the peaks and valleys in a draw cycle are as important as the draw weight? For example in my case I think that for me a peak earlier on in the cycle is better as that is where my strenght is greatest, rather than at the end of the cycle.

Does that make sense?

If so, do you think the mpro single cam has an earleir peak than the Cat II duo cam? Is so does that render the mpro a bit "smoother."

Thanks,
Bruce

Let me correct myself if I may. I tend to get a bit hard headed when it comes to comparing cams. I would have to say that shootability and feel is very important in a target/field bow. In either case, as the distance is known, speed should not be a consideration as any bow today will be fast enough to reach 80 yards and even beyond.

So Bruce, you are pretty much right on with your suggestion about the draw cycle. Now, that being said there are several other considerations in a target bow. A2A is one of them as is riser geometry and overall bow geometry.

I tend to favor longer A2A bows for such work due to their stability and balance. The less reflex in the riser the better, too, for the same reasons and less possibilty of inducing torque.

I always liked a rounder wheel or cam with about 60-65% letoff. Also I liked a light bow, because I loaded it down with stabilizers and V bars and such to help with the overall feel and balance of the bow in my hand. Today that would mean I would not prefer a bow with parallel limbs, as a general rule.
Parallel limb bows are going to be heavier to get a good A2A simply because of a longer riser, but all that weight might not be where I want it and they are usually top heavy to beat all get-out. I want the weight on the bottom to help the bow hang vertical.

Now that I've bored you to death with some of my opinions I would defer you to Scepterman30, if he would be so kind as to chime in. He's more into target shooting than I am, although I once was pretty active at it.

OK Scott, where you at??

Destroyer
05-14-2010, 11:15 PM
One thing about a hard cam is the narrow valley that they usually have. They can be difficult to shoot at first, being very critical as far as draw length is concerned. But when you are use to it, becomes an automatic 'draw check', creep a bit forward and you get notified straight way. More accurate imho.

And as bfisher has pointed out, you can use a lighter draw weight for the same speed. If I had to purchase another bow, that's the way I would go. :D

bronko22000
05-15-2010, 05:29 PM
Don't rule out the Cheetah. I got one in 45 - 60# and I have it set at 52#. What a shooter. After shooting my Firecat at 68#, shooting the Cheetah is no effort at all. Now don't get me wrong, the Firecat shoots great and is blazing fast. But the single cam on the Cheetah is silky smooth.
If you're still looking for a Moab, give Andrews Archery in Frackville, PA a call. Last time I was up there, he had a couple '09s that he had on sale.

bb11
05-17-2010, 09:35 PM
Thanks again to all for your thoughts! For clarity, I am not a tournament shooter. When I mention shootablilty is in the context of practice and hunting where you need to draw the bow after sitting or stalking for hours, many times in the cold.

Destroyer
05-17-2010, 10:12 PM
So I guess it comes down to what you are more accurate with. Lower poundage harsher draw or higher poundage with a smooth draw. Of course, that's if you looking for a particular minimum fps. If your not worried about speed at all, then low poundage smooth draw will have its benefits.

Since d-loops, high let off & release aids, I don't think its as clear cut as when we only used finger release. That is one time a smooth draw is essential imho.