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View Full Version : Do you have to back the limb bolts out...



hunt123
04-30-2010, 06:12 AM
before pressing? If I have significant work to do, I'll just forget about a press on my 09 Bengal and just back the limb bolts out however far I need to. But if I need to do something quick and not very involved, it would be much faster and simpler to just pop it into a press. Don't have to reset DW afterwards either. So officially, am I supposed to back the limb bolts out before pressing it? None of our local bow shops do, but I've read somewhere that some manufacturers require that.

Montalaar
04-30-2010, 07:13 AM
I do not do either.

It is recommended for any bow type but it is not necessary if you just want to do something small on your bow as a peep change or anything similar.

alex
04-30-2010, 12:20 PM
I have the Bowmaster press and just have the feeling that it'd be better to back the limb bolts. May be with other press it would be unnecessary :)

bfisher
04-30-2010, 01:26 PM
I have the Bowmaster press and just have the feeling that it'd be better to back the limb bolts. May be with other press it would be unnecessary :)

I use a Bowmaster also, and although it's not a "requirement" to back off the limbs I would recommend it if you are shooting high poundage. I only shoot 42# so have never done it with mine. However, when I was shooting around 60# I would back them down about 4 turns. Just makes the job easier. If I were using a bench mounted press I would still back them down just to reduce any chance of twisting a riser.

As I said, it's not a requirement, just a suggestion.

hunt123
04-30-2010, 01:53 PM
Even if a person pressed a bow far enough to replace string and cable (without backing out the limb bolts), I would think that would be less stress on the limbs than going to full draw and shooting an arrow.

polaris754
04-30-2010, 05:55 PM
hey all i can say is that i had my string and cables replaced, it looked like the dude really gave it the cranks to to release the string , first time i drew the bow it made a creek noise . i took it back the next day and the dudes tell in me that because its a new string and cables every thing has to work back in , all i need to have him do is spray wd 40 on the limbs, well the rest is history, limbs cracked at full draw on a deer opening day 09, i personally think the dude over cranked the press , id back em off if i was u :rolleyes:

hunt123
05-01-2010, 04:48 AM
hey all i can say is that i had my string and cables replaced, it looked like the dude really gave it the cranks to to release the string , first time i drew the bow it made a creek noise . i took it back the next day and the dudes tell in me that because its a new string and cables every thing has to work back in , all i need to have him do is spray wd 40 on the limbs, well the rest is history, limbs cracked at full draw on a deer opening day 09, i personally think the dude over cranked the press , id back em off if i was u :rolleyes:
Spray WD40 on the limbs?? Man, I'd never go back there. I think I'll call Joel and see if Martin has an "official" position on it.

bowgramp59
05-02-2010, 02:40 PM
the only 2 bows i ever had cracked limbs on, both were pressed i want own a bow that has to be pressed. when i change the strings or peep i back the limbs out 5 rounds then use a piece 5/16 of all thread padded with a piece of clear rubber hose. i remove the sts and slide the all thread thru the slots under the cam and the idler wheel, ther is a solid padded piece on one end and a padded piece that slips on to the all threads on the other end then a nut. turn it a few rounds and do what i want to, but it is always good to back the limbs off a few rounds reguardless what you use[ jmo]

hunt123
05-02-2010, 05:20 PM
Now that all thread is a slick idea. I might like that better than a turnbuckle and cable. I may try that! Guess I better be backing limbs down first. Although my bow is 70# and I'm shooting at 60 right now so it probably wouldn't be as bad as pressing it if I were shooting at 70#.