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View Full Version : #$*&@% draw module screws



Brem
11-04-2010, 04:05 PM
We have all fought this demon i think. Factory module screws coming loose. Rusting because they are carbon steel, stripping because they are soft. Well i decided to try lengthing my draw a notch to see how i shot( it was too long and I shot worse) and had to fight to get them loose then fight keep them tight. I went to move the mod back to its proper spot and broke two allens before the last one would come loose.
End of rant. I went down the the hardware store and picked up some stainless steel screws that are a little shorter than the factory(they barely protrude out the back of the mod) and put them in. tightened them down no loctite or anything. Then i proceeded to fling a 100 or so arrows....they never came loose. I am sold and you all should try it.

Arrow Splitter
11-04-2010, 04:18 PM
I haven't had that problem(which I probably will:rolleyes:), but I'll to try stainless steel if I do.

SonnyThomas
11-04-2010, 05:38 PM
One thing we should all do, when we have a problem and solve it we should contact Martin. Or even have a forum in here in solely for the betterment of products of Martin. No complaining, just forward good ethics of getting a problem stopped and removed from the future.

I haven't had the mod screws come loose yet (knock on wood). I have had them so tight that I broke off Allens and had to drill out the screw - messing up threads of a cam isn't something you want. The breaking of Allens I blame on the tiny Allen opening. Here, on a FireCat, I installed Pearson Allen screws that have the bigger Allen opening - end of problem. And when the tight screws did break loosed I'd smell something like sulfur or sewer smell. This of course is the corrosion of the aluminum getting super heated for just a millisecond.

I haven't stripped any threads yet, but noticed the threads were not as should be.
1 - Quality Control should be held rigid.
2 - A bigger Allen opening at least for the module screws.

Ehunter
11-04-2010, 06:07 PM
One other big problem is the use of dissimilar metals. The screws should be the exact same material that the cam is made from. Putting a steel screw in an aluminum cam causes an undue amount of corrosion, as both metals work against each other. That leads to most of the common problems. Corroding, rusting, etc. It even leads to what is perceived as overtightening, but it's actually the corrosion binding the screws up. I see it alot in my business, stainless screws going into brass anchors, etc.

Destroyer
11-04-2010, 06:55 PM
The screws should be the exact same material that the cam is made from.

Don't think so, I wouldn't use a alloy screw in a cam, way too soft, and if it binds........;)



1 - Quality Control should be held rigid.

1- Didn't know that manufactures used that term anymore lol!

RobD
11-05-2010, 08:34 PM
We have all fought this demon i think. Factory module screws coming loose. Rusting because they are carbon steel, stripping because they are soft. Well i decided to try lengthing my draw a notch to see how i shot( it was too long and I shot worse) and had to fight to get them loose then fight keep them tight. I went to move the mod back to its proper spot and broke two allens before the last one would come loose.
End of rant. I went down the the hardware store and picked up some stainless steel screws that are a little shorter than the factory(they barely protrude out the back of the mod) and put them in. tightened them down no loctite or anything. Then i proceeded to fling a 100 or so arrows....they never came loose. I am sold and you all should try it.

OMG, I just went threw 2 allen wrenches today. Trying to remove them. I went to hardware store trying to get aluminum screws because they are lighter and don't rust.They didn't have them so, I ended up buying SS little shorter.

Just called my friend that has a Firecat and warned him about the mod screws this after noon.

WOW we were on the same exact page today. LMAO ;)

Ehunter
11-07-2010, 02:22 PM
I didn't mean for anyone to use alloy screws. lol I merely meant that they could do something like a steel female socket molded into the cam, etc. One thing that did spring to mind while typing this is, use some automotive anti-seize on the threads before installation. The kind they use on head bolts, etc. Would prevent the seizing, and should not let the screws work loose. Just a thought from someone that has very few. lol

DonsHarley
11-07-2010, 05:02 PM
Sonny wher do you get these Pearson Allen screws?

dragonsfire311
11-07-2010, 05:28 PM
have not had that problem yet, but I'll keep your solution in mind.

SonnyThomas
11-07-2010, 05:30 PM
1 - Quality Control should be held rigid.


1- Didn't know that manufactures used that term anymore lol!

Comes from working in factory. I went through so many different quality control methods I can't remember all the names. Six Sigma was going strong when I retired. Basically, it's nothing but the operator doing his or her job and checking your work is part of the job.
Names? Pfffft. First I was a machine operator. Machines had designated classes, 1M25, 2M11, 7M10, etc. Later, with class designations, the company gave us titles, Grade IV Machine Specialist and so forth.Then we became Machine Tool Managers. Of course with Six Sigma came belt designations. I think I was a Yellow Belt, whatever that is. Fancy names,huh? And still we were nothing more than machine operators.

madlaz
11-08-2010, 02:20 AM
the best way to solve this comes from Nuts and Bolts a very reputable tuner probably the smartest guy on archery .he told me to dip the screws into string wax like you do to keep the point from coming loose in an insert.this will keep corosion down and keep your cam screws tight .

alex
11-08-2010, 08:26 AM
Or you can use chewing gum to keep the screws tight :)

rjd
11-08-2010, 08:06 PM
Anti - sieze is your friend when using to differant metals. The next choice is the wax .