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View Full Version : Nock High, Why?



MLN1963
03-24-2011, 03:20 PM
Why do I always see setting up a bow nock high, is it because of single cam bows and nock travel? What about a Hybrid cam or Binary cam? Or a FC400? :cool:

archerx7
03-24-2011, 03:35 PM
Most single cam bows will tune about 1/8-1/4" nock high because of nock travel. Dual cams and slaved dual cams (binarys) will usually tune with the nock level, if the cams are correctly timed. Hybrids will tune nock level to 1/4" high depending on the manufacturer.

MLN1963
03-24-2011, 04:27 PM
Where would you suggest to start with a FC400? I am going to shoot FOBs as well and they suggest level.

archerx7
03-24-2011, 05:28 PM
Where would you suggest to start with a FC400? I am going to shoot FOBs as well and they suggest level.

If the cams are correctly timed..........it should tune with the nock point level. I have a custom that shoots an Alien X and uses FOB's, his bow tuned nock level and the Nitro cams are nearly identical to the Hybrix cams.

Ehunter
03-24-2011, 05:33 PM
I know that some shooters used to set their rigs up slightly nock high, with the belief that it helped with windage. I don't know if that's still a common thing or not though.

SonnyThomas
03-24-2011, 06:14 PM
Well, starting with a 1/8 to 1/4" high nock is general throughout the bow industry. 1 -Most generally it's pretty easy to get good arrow flight from a nock high setting. 2 - At 0 nock there is a chance of driving into the rest (note; when this began drop rests weren't around). Timing off, either bow or drop rest or both, and 0 nock may have the arrow making contact with rest.

When setting up a bow I start with 1/8" high for either dual/hybrid cams or single cam. A few years back with single cams I generally started with 1/4".

SonnyThomas
03-24-2011, 06:20 PM
I know that some shooters used to set their rigs up slightly nock high, with the belief that it helped with windage. I don't know if that's still a common thing or not though.

More correctly, it was believed that having the arrow correct itself the same way was a benefit. Okay, high nock out of the bows the vanes catching air forced the back of the arrow back down consistently. With a "bullet hole" arrow there is no correction, so to speak. Always seeming in rush today, I haven't tried testing the old procedure.