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rpalt1
04-09-2011, 05:19 PM
I paper tuned my bow today and have it shooting bullet holes. The problem now is my broadheads are 10" left Before doing tune they were flying great . What did I do?:confused:

archerx7
04-09-2011, 06:43 PM
I paper tuned my bow today and have it shooting bullet holes. The problem now is my broadheads are 10" left Before doing tune they were flying great . What did I do?:confused:

Where are your field points hitting in relation to the broadheads ?

rpalt1
04-09-2011, 07:33 PM
field points are dead center of target broadheads are left?:confused:

SonnyThomas
04-09-2011, 07:37 PM
Paper tuning, the great debate of; Is it even worth doing? Paper tuning a bow for someone else is one of my most dreaded things to do. I won't do it for someone else. They can do it. Now, that I'm done raving....

The thing about paper tuning, you can have something not right and get bullet holes. The arrow may be wrong, spine or build of. Assuming the bow is timed/synced and limbs as they should be; The rest can be off to the degree that paper results lie. And then there is the one doing shooting.

I don't trust lasers, Ezy Eye and the like.

Arrow correct, I prefer to eyeball in center shot (horizontal). Align the string with the groove of the top wheel or cam and check the alignment of the arrow to the aligned string to groove. If the arrow is not aligned move the rest until the arrow, string aligned to the wheel or cam groove is all on one plane, all aligned.
Above done, then paper tune at no more than 6 to 8 feet. If able to, use a bare shaft to start. Bullet hole results then go the fletched shaft. If then a ragged tear there is contact somewhere. If good move to the next step. If paper shows a bit high leave it and correct the horizontal. Horizontal correct then correct vertical. Done, stop.

Broadhead to field point impact. Shoot a group of field points. Then shoot a group of broadheads. Which ever way the broadheads are off to the field points, move the rest a tiny bit as to move the broadheads in the direction of the field points. Same for the vertical, move rest to close the gap or move nocking point in opposite direction.

If you have a Martin manual, look it over and you should find the manner to correct your issues.

rpalt1
04-09-2011, 07:46 PM
Thanks sonny. You gave me something to work on tomorrow :D

Simple Life
04-10-2011, 03:02 AM
Paper tuning, the great debate of; Is it even worth doing? Paper tuning a bow for someone else is one of my most dreaded things to do. I won't do it for someone else. They can do it. Now, that I'm done raving....

The thing about paper tuning, you can have something not right and get bullet holes. The arrow may be wrong, spine or build of. Assuming the bow is timed/synced and limbs as they should be; The rest can be off to the degree that paper results lie. And then there is the one doing shooting.

I don't trust lasers, Ezy Eye and the like.

Arrow correct, I prefer to eyeball in center shot (horizontal). Align the string with the groove of the top wheel or cam and check the alignment of the arrow to the aligned string to groove. If the arrow is not aligned move the rest until the arrow, string aligned to the wheel or cam groove is all on one plane, all aligned.
Above done, then paper tune at no more than 6 to 8 feet. If able to, use a bare shaft to start. Bullet hole results then go the fletched shaft. If then a ragged tear there is contact somewhere. If good move to the next step. If paper shows a bit high leave it and correct the horizontal. Horizontal correct then correct vertical. Done, stop.

Broadhead to field point impact. Shoot a group of field points. Then shoot a group of broadheads. Which ever way the broadheads are off to the field points, move the rest a tiny bit as to move the broadheads in the direction of the field points. Same for the vertical, move rest to close the gap or move nocking point in opposite direction.

If you have a Martin manual, look it over and you should find the manner to correct your issues.

I agree with Sonny,except on onions:p.Broadheads will show any flaws with the set-up.
If high left raise nock point first to bring down and then move rest to right,if just left move rest to right.Do all this in fine movements.

SonnyThomas
04-10-2011, 05:43 AM
[QUOTE=Simple Life;45797]I agree with Sonny,except on onions:p.QUOTE]

Kids.... :(

martinbowhunter
04-10-2011, 08:19 AM
Paper tuning, the great debate of; Is it even worth doing? Paper tuning a bow for someone else is one of my most dreaded things to do. I won't do it for someone else. They can do it. Now, that I'm done raving....

The thing about paper tuning, you can have something not right and get bullet holes. The arrow may be wrong, spine or build of. Assuming the bow is timed/synced and limbs as they should be; The rest can be off to the degree that paper results lie. And then there is the one doing shooting.

I don't trust lasers, Ezy Eye and the like.

Arrow correct, I prefer to eyeball in center shot (horizontal). Align the string with the groove of the top wheel or cam and check the alignment of the arrow to the aligned string to groove. If the arrow is not aligned move the rest until the arrow, string aligned to the wheel or cam groove is all on one plane, all aligned.
Above done, then paper tune at no more than 6 to 8 feet. If able to, use a bare shaft to start. Bullet hole results then go the fletched shaft. If then a ragged tear there is contact somewhere. If good move to the next step. If paper shows a bit high leave it and correct the horizontal. Horizontal correct then correct vertical. Done, stop.

Broadhead to field point impact. Shoot a group of field points. Then shoot a group of broadheads. Which ever way the broadheads are off to the field points, move the rest a tiny bit as to move the broadheads in the direction of the field points. Same for the vertical, move rest to close the gap or move nocking point in opposite direction.

If you have a Martin manual, look it over and you should find the manner to correct your issues.

Sonny, why don't you trust lasers such as the ezy eye?

rpalt1
04-10-2011, 10:24 AM
Sonny thanks so much. JUst got done and heads are poi with field tips now Yeah;)

HawgEnvy
04-10-2011, 11:39 AM
Sonny, why don't you trust lasers such as the ezy eye?

better question is what does Sonny have against delicious,flavorful onions?

martinbowhunter
04-10-2011, 12:09 PM
better question is what does Sonny have against delicious,flavorful onions?

Till this day they make him cry?

SonnyThomas
04-10-2011, 12:43 PM
Sonny, why don't you trust lasers such as the ezy eye?

First, you have cast risers. They are not machined so no real "square" to anything. So where's the laser point? Second, machined risers. Great! Now, how about the tolerances of the rest of the bow back to the face the laser is bolted to?

So, older bows and cast bows, forget lasering. Today's machined bow, lasers at best will get you in the "ball park." So for the all practical reason; You can eyeball center shot just as close, just as easy without the cost of the laser.

The above said, there is a laser out that mounts to the string, so to speak. It is adjusted to the string, can show cam lean, help set center shot and even set adjustable sight pins. It was just recently, again, noted on AT. http://www.doubletakearchery.com/bowplane/index.htm



better question is what does Sonny have against delicious,flavorful onions?

You must have the wrong Sonny. Onions are the "fruit of the Gods." Onions improves your health and most importantly they improve your archery skills. :D

gravedigger
04-10-2011, 02:19 PM
it's SL and i who dont dig them onions,nasty stuff

Simple Life
04-10-2011, 02:42 PM
it's SL and i who dont dig them onions,nasty stuff

Right on GD

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-green/greensmilies-012.gif (http://www.greensmilies.com)

elkslayer4x5
04-10-2011, 03:41 PM
it's SL and i who dont dig them onions,nasty stuff

You kids need you're veggies. :D

martinbowhunter
04-10-2011, 03:44 PM
You kids need you're veggies. :D

x2 And fish:p