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Rangerj
04-24-2011, 06:53 PM
I have read that a bow should be maxed out for the best performance.Then I have read that with the new bows it Doesn't matter. Example A 70lbs bow backed off to 60lbs does it really make a difference?Thanks.

SonnyThomas
04-24-2011, 07:17 PM
No, maxed out limbs give no more accuracy than those backed off. Not with today's bows anyway. Better limb pockets, better design and closer tolerances do this. If not trying different limbs settings I'm reading of what's taking place.

Virtually all manufacturers and top coaches say that being able to hold the wall give best accuracy and eliminate problems. Creeping tuning takes out some of the error. That odd ball flier that comes every so often? Is it that you're not on the wall, go to pull the trigger or apply back tension and then that little bit of take up to get on the wall has you fire?

Too much off the wall. Think about this. Measure your peep to the top of the arrow with the bow relaxed. Then have someone measure your peep to the top of the arrow at full draw (use care). Now, if you ease up a little doesn't this let the peep go up just a bit? If that bit up then you have a new sight line and the arrow will impact a bit high. Now, to compound this issue we have bows with high letoffs and long valleys. We don't notice easing up. If with lower letoffs shorter valleys come and we usually add that little extra to stay on the wall - not let the bow get away.

Rangerj
04-24-2011, 07:34 PM
Thanks Sonny, That was the info I needed.Good read.

cyclepath
04-24-2011, 07:42 PM
I have read that a bow should be maxed out for the best performance.Then I have read that with the new bows it Doesn't matter. Example A 70lbs bow backed off to 60lbs does it really make a difference?Thanks.

As Sonny explained, with todays bows it doesn't really matter. Most all bows ibo specs are made at 70# with a 30" draw. For optimal speed your bow should be at those settings. You would loose some speed at a lower draw weight as well as a shorter draw length is all.

NuttyNative
04-24-2011, 08:46 PM
I'm hard headed on a few things and this is one of them. Yes, ? pounds is ? pounds but how it's applied is different. I just put 50-60 pound limbs on my BT, taking off the 60-70.
With the 60-70 backed off to 62 it felt weak and spongy. With the 50-60's maxed at 62 it is solid, and faster. I chronoed it before and after the limb change, I gained 4 fps. Maxed out limbs will give peak performance in my opinion. Maybe it's all in my head, but I believe my eyes and the feel of my bow.

SonnyThomas
04-25-2011, 05:42 AM
When think of overall performance I think of accuracy foremost. Speed can be gained through other channels.

As for Bowtech, I had a new 05 Old Glory. The speed cams of the period made the 60.9 pound certified limbs feel like 75 pounds.

The same above Old Glory maxed out felt super smooth to the person who bought it, but then he was then shooting a BT "something" with 102 pounds limbs.

Spiker
04-25-2011, 05:55 AM
I'm hard headed on a few things and this is one of them. Yes, ? pounds is ? pounds but how it's applied is different. I just put 50-60 pound limbs on my BT, taking off the 60-70.
With the 60-70 backed off to 62 it felt weak and spongy. With the 50-60's maxed at 62 it is solid, and faster. I chronoed it before and after the limb change, I gained 4 fps. Maxed out limbs will give peak performance in my opinion. Maybe it's all in my head, but I believe my eyes and the feel of my bow.

I'm an old hard head too. I shoot all my bows maxed out. Not because I am trying to get the most speed out of them but because when you back off the limb bolts you lighten the preload and I can feel the difference in vibration.
Maxed out just feels way more 'solid' to me...
I adjust the 'accuracy' with the arrows - cut them a bit longer/shorter - change point weight - whatever...

cherryju1ce
04-25-2011, 08:32 AM
If you were to shoot 60-70 pound limbs at 60 pounds, and a set of 50-60 pound limbs at the same poundage, I do believe that there would be a few differences.

As for speed, I don't think you'd lose much...maybe 5 fps. However, I do think that you'd notice a big difference in vibration. As Spiker explained, backing the limbs off takes pre-load off of them, not to mention the fact that the limbs have much more room to recoil between the limb bolt and the limb pocket.

I always try to buy limbs that will max out about 1-2 pounds over the poundage I want to shoot. For example, if I want to shoot 52 pounds for indoors, I'll look for a set of limbs that maxes out at 53-54. That way, I can back the limb bolts off only a half turn from maximum poundage, limiting recoil and vibration and still maintaining the pre-load.

bfisher
04-25-2011, 10:01 AM
I guess I'm in the minority here. Very seldom do I shoot a bow at it's max weight. I do know what my limitation are and order my bows accordingly. For instance, if I knew I were going to shoot a bow at 62-63 lbs. I would special order one with 65# limbs. I would not get a 70# and I might even get a 60# bow and shoot it near the top of the range. I take no stock in having to shoot a bow at a fixed draw weight.

Unlike Spiker and some others I don't play around with my arrows trying to get them to the perfect specs for the bow. I just cut them to my draw length and let them hang over the rest. I may play with point weight some, but for the most part I just pick a spine that will be compatable within a given weight range for the length and then tune the bow to shoot them. If I have to back off the limbs a turn or two to get them to fly well then so be it. Let the draw weight fall where it may as long as the accuracy is there. Sometimes I get the bow set and don't even bother weighing it to see what it's pulling. Who cares? Afterall, it's just a number.

Now it is true that a bow will shoot more efficiently at or near the max, but not so much that you're likely to tell with the eye. Backed way off the bow will probably make more noise as the rigging will not be as taut, but more like a rubber band, but again, it's not usually that perceptable and you can always add string silencers to the string and/or cables to dampen them.

Rangerj
04-25-2011, 07:08 PM
Thanks for asll the replies. I am recovering from severe Rotator cuff surgery,Doc says he don't think I can shoot my bows anymore.Hope to prove him wrong. I may be looking at gettingn60lb limbs to replace the 70lbs I have now.:cool:

cherryju1ce
04-25-2011, 07:46 PM
Thanks for asll the replies. I am recovering from severe Rotator cuff surgery,Doc says he don't think I can shoot my bows anymore.Hope to prove him wrong. I may be looking at gettingn60lb limbs to replace the 70lbs I have now.:cool:

If there's ANY advice I can tell you, it's to listen to EXACTLY what your surgeon and physical therapist say. I work in a PT clinic (graduating DPT 2014) and we see our fair share of rotator cuff repairs...there's a VERY strict time line that needs to be adhered to, and I'm sure you'll be in much better shape if you follow your precautions to the "T."

cyclepath
04-25-2011, 07:57 PM
I'm waiting on my new limbs, I ordered 70# like I have now. I don't know what they will max out at YET. The limbs I did have maxed out at 74#. It's impressive shooting with that weight but not very practical for me. 62# is just fine for practicing for me and I don't notice anything different as far as performance. I still hit what I am aiming at and I like blowing through targets that others can't shooting more poundage. When hunting season comes around I'll crack it back up for bambi. Right now I am enjoying my viper. You want to get stronger, shoot a recurve or longbow for awhile.

Rangerj
04-25-2011, 08:11 PM
If there's ANY advice I can tell you, it's to listen to EXACTLY what your surgeon and physical therapist say. I work in a PT clinic (graduating DPT 2014) and we see our fair share of rotator cuff repairs...there's a VERY strict time line that needs to be adhered to, and I'm sure you'll be in much better shape if you follow your precautions to the "T."

Thanks for your reply. I am doing everything the pt says and and more so maybe I can get it back.

nuker
05-05-2011, 04:55 PM
A problem I've seen with backing out the limbs has more to do with timing issues than "efficiency". It's worth looking at. Timing will rob alot of speed, give the "spongy" back wall, and contribute to noise.
As for injuries, and age, you don't have to shoot telephone poles at 300fps to be successful hunting. A 40# modern Compound packs more energy than a 50# recurve did 30 years ago, and many deer fell to them. Rely on shot placement rather than brute force. You may never pull 70# again, but you may be able to pull 40-50#. Good luck.

Destroyer
05-07-2011, 04:12 AM
The bow can be a bit nosier if you shoot with them backed out but accuracy? No difference. I agree with spiker, the bow feels more solid maxed out.