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Thread: Rytera Seeker

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by SonnyThomas View Post
    Destroyer, hate to disagree with you, but in the past overdraws did have their place.
    I know, I just hate them lol! They were good for the rocky ground we hunted on, very hard on alloy's and with the overdraw let me shoot them once the end was broken off. Yeah good for getting your speed up but not so good for consistent accuracy. The further away from the center of the grip the more any torque is amplified.

    Quote Originally Posted by SonnyThomas View Post
    Of short brace height, 6 inches and under, and overdraws; Taking good form and good grip in consideration, the real thing that effects either is follow through.
    I agree on the brace height. Makes no difference what the figure is, it depends on the archer and how the bow shoots. 5", 6" or 7" there is not much difference anyway, its only when advertising tries to say one is more 'forgiving' that I get steamed up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake-the-snake View Post
    Im not trying to start anything, just a friendly debate
    Debate away Jake!

  2. #22
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    I think I'll throw another curveball into this discussion since a lot of you are talking about torque. One of the major things that can lead to torque is the holding weight at full draw. Take any bow with certain riser geometry. Increase the holding weight from say 80% to 60% and that bow will not torque as easily. Hence, just another reason many target shooters prefer more holding weight.

    I love reading discussions like this, getting peoples' point of view. The only problem is that we get caught up in one aspect of what causes torque and other problems. Riser design, brace height, parallel vs non-parallel limbs, rest position, overdraws, etc. The list goes on and on. The fact is that it is not one thing that causes torque problems, but a combination of many.

    Try this one on as an example. Overdraws. I shot them back in the early 90's just like a lot of you guys. As we know, follow through is more critical using one, or at least we say so. The rest is farther from the pivot point of the bow. The more the rest moves the more the arrow moves, right? Of course, this was with conventional shoot through rests of the time. Now let's fast forward to modern days and the use of drop away rests. We can mount a drop away to an overdraw, right? So we do this and shoot the bow with our normal form. For all intent the rest drops out of the picture instantaneously at the shot. Making no contact with the arrow it can't cause any arrow movement. All we're left with is the contact of the nock with the string.

    Now I'm not making a plea for the comeback of overdraws. Just pointing out that maybe the Seeker isn't so bad in that respect as it may depend on what type of rest is used.

    On another note, I see some guys mentioning the "test of time" in regard to improvements and such on this bow. This is just my opinion, but it is so unconventional with so many possible adjustments that it scares people. I predict sluggish sales with the possiblity that it won't even be in production more than a year or two. As said, time will tell.

    And as for comments about it being ugly? At least it isn't a waffle bow. Now that is ugly.
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  3. #23
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    I'm not sure I agree regarding torquing. But that could be because I am not totally convinced I fully understand which aspect of torquing we are talking about (oh dear, I am sorry for that).

    I have never shot overdraws for two reasons, 1) they never fitted the bows I had and 2) as I had a 31" DL at the time they were popular, I really didn't need the speed. Mind you, I didn't have access to a chrono either, so ignorance was bliss. I have shot a bow with an effective overdraw in the guise of the Bowman Accu-Riser.

    Unfortunately Stuart Bowman's web sites have all recently expired, but these are target bows developed by Stuart and they are as accurate as anything out there, BUT, in order to avoid torquing, the grip is on a vertical pivot. It is actually fitted with adjustable rose joints top and bottom and is free to swing left / right. I would have thought that with a smaller grip, as the modern bows have, and a disciplined grip (or lack of) then the same effect could be had by allowing the bow to settle.

    Although I am a dedicated finger shooter and I have shot this bow fingers, due to the association rules under which I shoot, that ban an arrow rest further than two inches from the grip, the only way I could use this bow, other than for fun, is as a FITA target bow, so that is how it is currently set up, and I shoot it using a release (spit). I normally shoot a 30" arrow, with the A-R I shoot 26" and I have had several Robin Hoods at 20 and 30 yards.

    The A-C has a lot of the adjustment that the Seeker aiso has, and it really isn't difficult to set up. You do need to think about what you are doing though and that may be the falldown of the Seeker, as many archers are not that technical when it comes to their bows, so they will need a GOOD pro-shop to help them set the bow up.

    I'm still keen though, as I do like the style.

    The A-R is the purple bow on the right

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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfisher View Post
    Making no contact with the arrow it can't cause any arrow movement. All we're left with is the contact of the nock with the string.
    But still allows for torquing. Some think that problem only comes from the rest but as long as the arrow is in contact with the string, any movement of the bow is still transferred to the arrow until it leaves the bow. Drop rests may reduce it but its still there.

    Quote Originally Posted by bfisher View Post
    I predict sluggish sales with the possiblity that it won't even be in production more than a year or two.
    Agree.

    The jaguar

    Last edited by Destroyer; 07-11-2011 at 02:39 PM.

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