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Thread: wrist straps?

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  1. #1
    wrenches
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    Default wrist straps?

    I hear everyone talking about these wrist straps. what aspect of shooting a bow does this help with. i am new to shooting bows so there may be more dumb questions to follow!!!!!

  2. #2
    Bubba101st
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    The wrist strap that is attached to the bow is there to keep the bow from jumping out of your hand. Keeping it from falling to the ground/floor. I have a friend that refuses to put on on his bow and I have seen him drop his bow twice. It could get really ugly if or when stuff starts to break.

  3. #3
    mysnake12
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    Not to start a big controversy on this subject, however there are lots of pros and cons...to explain better...it is kind of like shooting a gun...you always squeeze the trigger never pull.....with bows...you never grip the riser handle because of torque you place on the handle, on the other hand....a open hand may also cause inconsistent torque depending on angle of shot...so I grasp the bow, not grip, and like all things... this might have its drawbacks???? However, if you choose open hand, I will agree with the "bubba101st" that a wrist strap will save you a lot of heartache!!!! But, for what it is worth, try it both ways and find the most consistent shot placement for your style of shooting....open hand or grasping will both work....I have just found that in a vertically challenged shot that grasping works best for me...just my opinion, K?

  4. #4
    wrenches
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    thanks for the info. I have just been grasping the grip instead of useing an open hand because i did fin it to work better.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    Grasping is one of the worst things you can do when shooting a bow. Eventually you start grasping the bow before the arrow leaves the bow, causing torque, which adversely affect accuracy. It can also lead to target panic, which you definitely don't want--believe me.

    Actually, if you shoot a bow properly or nearly so, there is no way to grip or grasp. The bow hand should be at about a 40 degree angle with the riser on the meat of the thumb. The fingers should not be held open or tense. The bow hand should be totally relaxed.

    Herein is the reason for the wrist sling. At the shot you just let the bow do what it wants to do. You shoot the bow. Let the bow shoot the arrow. The only thing you should be thinking about is aiming. Keep aiming till the arrow hits it's mark. It's kinda like shooting a gun. You aim and squeeze, with the mind staying in the aiming mode. You shoot the gun. Let the gun shoot the bullet.

    I would suggest you walk on over to www.archerytalk.com and join up there. There are some very good pics by a guy called "Nuts&Bolts" that help with what I have been explaining here.

  6. #6
    cdfirefighter1
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfisher
    Grasping is one of the worst things you can do when shooting a bow. Eventually you start grasping the bow before the arrow leaves the bow, causing torque, which adversely affect accuracy. It can also lead to target panic, which you definitely don't want--believe me.

    Actually, if you shoot a bow properly or nearly so, there is no way to grip or grasp. The bow hand should be at about a 40 degree angle with the riser on the meat of the thumb. The fingers should not be held open or tense. The bow hand should be totally relaxed.

    Herein is the reason for the wrist sling. At the shot you just let the bow do what it wants to do. You shoot the bow. Let the bow shoot the arrow. The only thing you should be thinking about is aiming. Keep aiming till the arrow hits it's mark. It's kinda like shooting a gun. You aim and squeeze, with the mind staying in the aiming mode. You shoot the gun. Let the gun shoot the bullet.

    I would suggest you walk on over to www.archerytalk.com and join up there. There are some very good pics by a guy called "Nuts&Bolts" that help with what I have been explaining here.

    What he said.... archerytalk.com is a great site with alot Of info on various subjects and you can get an answer to nearly any bow related question you may have.. there is a world on knowledge there

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