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Thread: New to bow hunting

  1. #1
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    Default New to bow hunting

    Hello everyone. just got into bow shooting (literally today) was out shooting with a buddy. he has a bowtech (not sure model) set at 65lbs and shot ok at 20 yds. missed 3'x3' target 4/10 shots hit 6/10 2 of them where right behind shoulder on deer target anyways had alot of fun just shooting. so i got on craigslist and started shopping for bows. one of the bows i was looking at was a
    martin threshold 2010 model for 175 comes here is a list of what it comes with 5 pin truglo sight, 6 arrow quiver, free flight release, hostage rest, brand new string. just wanted to know if that was a fair price considering new but with less accessories is only 200 for 2012 model. my main question though is if not this bow what would be a good bow for around 250 max new or used. if it matters i am 6'3" and to be honest pulling that 65lbs wasn't very hard even after 10 shots but i do know that i should start with less for better technique. thanks for any help in advance. one thing i do know is that i will be doing mostly deer hunting with occasional elk (if and when i get good enough).

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    Senior Member wscywabbit's Avatar
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    First off, welcome to the forum and the sport !

    Second off, I think the Threshold would probably be a good starter bow, with more than enough oomph to take a deer or an elk. I started off with a Martin Saber, which has similar specs, and hunted with it for a few years before I bought a new bow. That being said, you might try the classifieds here or at www.archerytalk.com to find a good used bow for a decent price. Martin has several nice bows, and you'll find that they are easier to draw even at higher poundages than some of the competition.

    Also, FYI, many many hunters use bows that are considerably less than 70# draw weights, one of the most notable is Ted Nugent who swears by a 50# bow. Many speed freaks will tell you that you need to use the higher draw weights to harvest big game, but most states have a 40# minimum. So don't get wrapped up in draw weight and speed at this stage, I think you have a good attitude and start knowing that repetition and teqnique are key to success.

    A good rule of thumb is that if you can't sit down in a chair, raise your feet off of the floor and pull the bow back easily, its too much bow for you. This not only will keep you from hurting yourself by pulling a muscle (damaged shoulders are a common theme among some archers), but will make those cold mornings sitting on stand much easier because cold stiff muscles do not always like to pull a heavy string and may make you miss that great wall hanger!

    Your best bet is going to be getting your hands on as many bows as you can and finding out what is comfortable for you. You're also going to want to pay close attention to draw lengths, because given your height, you'll have a fairly long draw length. Find a good dealer with a proshop, or a friend that has a firm grasp on the sport to help you get started and you'll be miles ahead of the game!

    Obviously those of us here on this forum hope that you join the ranks of Martin owners, so be sure to post some pics if you get one (we love bow-porn). Good luck and good hunting!
    In God and guns we trust;
    • One nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
    • A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.


    2011 Onza 3: 70#, 28.25 draw (AMO), 384 gr arrow, 288 fps
    2005 Saber: 70#, same arrow, 250 fps

  3. #3
    String builder/ Super Moderator Hutch~n~Son Archery's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum silvers46 and welcome to a great sport.






    Hutch
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    thanks for the replies much appreciated if i get one ill be sure to post it until then my search continues thanks again

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    [QUOTE=wscywabbit;82801]

    A good rule of thumb is that if you can't sit down in a chair, raise your feet off of the floor and pull the bow back easily, its too much WEIGHT for you. This not only will keep you from hurting yourself by pulling a muscle (damaged shoulders are a common theme among some archers), but will make those cold mornings sitting on stand much easier because cold stiff muscles do not always like to pull a heavy string and may make you miss that great wall hanger!

    QUOTE]

    FIXED it for ya.

    I think what Wabbit said will get you started. One thing about buying a bow, it HAS to feel good in your hand, during the draw cycle and during the shot. At full draw, you dont want to feel cramped or streched out. You want to be able to get a good solid ancher point or 2 maybe 3 if you can. Dont worry about missing 4 out of 10. the ablility to put the arrow where you want it comes with time and patience. Take your time and find one that you really like and that you feel good with. Keep in mind while you look that if the draw length is too long or too short, it wont feel right, but that doesnt mean that it is not the right bow for you.


    Good luck and WELCOME to the FEVER.
    "When a hunter is in a tree stand with high moral values and with the proper hunting ethics and richer for the experience, that hunter is 20 feet closer to God." -Fred Bear

    2012 Martin Cougar FC, Fury XT cam
    CE PileDriver arrow, 535 grains
    Speed: unknown

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    Senior Member cmwr's Avatar
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    welcome to the sport. I used to pull 70 lbs all the time. But I know now that 60 is a lords plenty for any north american game. Think about it...Fred Bear was killing everything on the planet including dangerous game with old recurve bows that were not even as fast as a modern 45# compound. I pull around 60 lbs and when I try spring turkey this year for the first time, I will be greatful that I can draw my bow back nice and slow without reaching for the sky which would surely spook a turkey.

  7. #7
    Senior Member cmwr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wscywabbit View Post
    First off, welcome to the forum and the sport !

    Second off, I think the Threshold would probably be a good starter bow, with more than enough oomph to take a deer or an elk. I started off with a Martin Saber, which has similar specs, and hunted with it for a few years before I bought a new bow. That being said, you might try the classifieds here or at www.archerytalk.com to find a good used bow for a decent price. Martin has several nice bows, and you'll find that they are easier to draw even at higher poundages than some of the competition.

    Also, FYI, many many hunters use bows that are considerably less than 70# draw weights, one of the most notable is Ted Nugent who swears by a 50# bow. Many speed freaks will tell you that you need to use the higher draw weights to harvest big game, but most states have a 40# minimum. So don't get wrapped up in draw weight and speed at this stage, I think you have a good attitude and start knowing that repetition and teqnique are key to success.

    A good rule of thumb is that if you can't sit down in a chair, raise your feet off of the floor and pull the bow back easily, its too much bow for you. This not only will keep you from hurting yourself by pulling a muscle (damaged shoulders are a common theme among some archers), but will make those cold mornings sitting on stand much easier because cold stiff muscles do not always like to pull a heavy string and may make you miss that great wall hanger!

    Your best bet is going to be getting your hands on as many bows as you can and finding out what is comfortable for you. You're also going to want to pay close attention to draw lengths, because given your height, you'll have a fairly long draw length. Find a good dealer with a proshop, or a friend that has a firm grasp on the sport to help you get started and you'll be miles ahead of the game!

    Obviously those of us here on this forum hope that you join the ranks of Martin owners, so be sure to post some pics if you get one (we love bow-porn). Good luck and good hunting!
    He is right in every aspect. But don't think cause your 6'3" you are gonna have a super long draw either. I am 6'1" and have a 28" draw.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmwr View Post
    He is right in every aspect. But don't think cause your 6'3" you are gonna have a super long draw either. I am 6'1" and have a 28" draw.
    Sound advice all the way around. I am 6' 2" and shoot a Cheetah @ 30" with a sting loop. It will take time to settle in. .....I have been thinking of getting a Threshold at setting it up exclusively for night hunting pigs and coyotes . I am tired of rigging down my light on there. Keep us posted.
    2010 Cheetah Mag. 64# NAP QuickTime 360 rest. Apex 3 pin w/light. Gold Tip 5575 Exposition Hunter arrows. 100grn Trophy Ridge Hammerheads, Six Shooter quiver, Trueball Copperhead release.

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