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Thread: Determine longbow draw weight for person with short draw length

  1. #1
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    Default Determine longbow draw weight for person with short draw length

    Happy New Year. I have been shooting a compound bow (Martin Mystic) over the last 4 years. My draw length on this bow is 26" and draw weight is 50 lbs. At this point I want get started in learning long bow shooting. I am considering in purchasing a Savannah long bow.

    I usually shoot the 50 meter and 100 meter targets at the club I practice at. Does anyone have any advice on the draw weight I should purchase for this bow considering my short draw length?


    Thanks in advance


    Andre

  2. #2
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
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    Recurves and Longbows are a lot differnt than compounds, in that you will be holding all of the draw weight at your anchor point, and unless you're shooting your compound with fingers, that change will also effect your draw length as well. That said, I'd say get a 35-40# Longbow as the lower draw weight will allow you to practice more. Several companys make inexpencive takedown models which will allow you to buy heavier limbs as you progress. Welcome to the site, glad you joined us!
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
    http://cascadianbowmen.com/
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

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    Member DeepRiverBowman's Avatar
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    Ditto ElkSlayer's comments. Compounds and longbows are different animals. I don't think DL and DW are related except when you purchase a longbow, the weight marked on the bow will be lower due to your DL being less than 28". That's what most bows are rated at. I agree that 35-40# is good to start with. You want a low enough weight that you can develop your form without developing bad habits due to too much weight. If it's fun and easy to shoot, you'll shoot it more and enjoy it long enough to get good with it. Move up in weight after you master the fundimentals.

    mike

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    Gentlemen thank you for your advice. I have access to a 30lbs takedown bow that I can practice with. I will try that and see how that works out.

  5. #5
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
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    Even better for you. With the light draw weight, you'll be able to practice form without really getting your fingers sore, and after you've became accustomed to shooting the long bow, you can decide what weight you really want to shoot.
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
    http://cascadianbowmen.com/
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

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