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Thread: Bow tuning tip

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  1. #1
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Bow tuning tip

    Best tip I know of; Don't drive yourself nuts!
    Yeah! There are so many different tuning procedures and everybody and their brother having a article or their way doing it.

    Basic tuning - probably the best for alround for getting the bow shooting reasonably darn good. Most would be good right here and forget the rest.

    Walk Back tuning; Fairly nice, short distance and gets the job done darned well. I use it for most all my customer and myself. 10 ft and 30 yards is what I use. ??? I think it was my 2010 Shadowcat I did this with and I won a novelty shoot, 2" clay disc at 53 yards. Drilled that sucker twice.

    Modified French Tuning; Probably works, but I got started with the full French tuning procedure and never checked out the Modififed version.

    French Tuning Procedure; Notably the finest tuning procedure for setting center shot. 9 feet to out where you can still hit with the same pin. I can usually keep on a target butt out to 55 and 60 yards. The longer the distance the more perfect center shot is. Shot Outdoor and Field for 3 years and placed and won my fair share of times. Have link if anyone is interested.

    Yoke tuning; I tune a yoke for cam lean, not fine tuning something I don't need fine tuned. See next.

    Kitchen Sink tuning; Glanced over this the other night. Lord have mercy. To me this is yoke tuning, but for other reasons. Why would you tinker with the yoke when you tinkered with it to eliminate cam lean? Ain't saying it doesn't work, just why drive yourself nuts?

    Bare shaft tuning; I'd rather take my wife shopping. This works, but having spoke with technicians that do this for a living, I'd not need it. First, bare shaft tuning is better done with the arrow weighted in the area of where the vanes will be with the same weight of the vanes (Scotch or electrical tape). Techs told me they have shot accurately out to 60 yards (2" groups).

    Paper tuning; Works, but figure it one step towards fine tuning your bow. I will not paper tune for someone. I will help them with adjustments, but that's it. Okay, my natural shooting is not the same as others. I paper tune and get great results and the owner takes the bow home, shoots through paper and rips it to shreds. So; "That bow mechanic down there doesn't know what he's doing!"

    Super tuning; Normally this is someone getting best performance from a bow. People send bows out for this. Duh? See Paper tuning. Yep, I can crank a few more rpms out of a bow, but how much do you want to pay for it? And if something goes wrong, dropped, new rest, different arrow, different draw lenght, you want to pay for another Super Tune?

  2. #2
    Senior Member wscywabbit's Avatar
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    Nicely put Sonny, I couldn't agree more. I also can't think of anything else to add, so I'll just say thank you and leave it at that! lol
    In God and guns we trust;
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    2011 Onza 3: 70#, 28.25 draw (AMO), 384 gr arrow, 288 fps
    2005 Saber: 70#, same arrow, 250 fps

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    Senior Member WildWilt15's Avatar
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    Great read! Thanks.
    Martin x-200 unsure of year
    2011 Mathews z7magnum
    2012 Mathews z7magnum
    2014 Mathews ChillR (on order)

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    Best tip I know of; Don't drive yourself nuts!
    easier said than done..

  5. #5
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Bow tuning tip

    Now, going hand in hand with my Bow tuning tip you have to build your arrows correctly.

    Yeah, I got bored at the shop today... First pic is from 20 yards. Second pic is from 30 yards - should be four holes.

    If you missed something you oughts to look again
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    Tell me about the fletching, looks backwards to me.

  7. #7
    Sonny Thomas
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    As usual I can't let go of things sometimes I got to reading the yoke tuning thing and Kitchen sink thing. I can't read through either. I go brain dead... I have the original write up and the expanded version and can't get through either.
    Too much is there that is not the what it's suppose to be. I would example John Dudley's write up on French tuning. Read it. There is nothing there but the brunt of the subject. No bare shaft stuff. No draw length stuff. Just the subject, French Tuning.

    I looked the getting the cam or wheel straight a full draw... Lord! I really don't have the equipment for doing the work and works is what it is. I mean, the bow has to be drawn and held. One arrow on each side of the cam or wheel are to split the bow string. Okay, say you straightened the cam or wheel to the bow string with bow at rest. Now, you perform this test, cam or wheel at full draw. Again, I don't have the draw board (or the patience) to check this, but bows having guide rods at full draw the cam or wheel should lean. So by this yoke/kitchen sink thing you twist the yoke to straighten the cam or wheel at full draw. Now, engaging brain (if it's working), wouldn't you have opposite cam or wheel lean with bow at rest? And isn't this swapping cam or wheel lean from at rest to full draw? Is this yoke/kitchen sink thing saying that it's better to have a straight cam or wheel at full draw than it is with bow at rest? Try something else; The cam/wheel is straight at full draw and going to leaning with the arrow leaving the bow. Am I thinking right?

    Of the yoke tuning. You're actually bending the upper limb to correct center shot. Correct? Okay, it just won't sink in my head.....

    Walk Back and Modified French tuning. From the reading of, somebody is pulling someone's leg. Yes, both can possibly work. BUT! Read both procedures. Hey! I'm so dang lazy I have the wife kick the dog to shut it up. Both have you shooting close and backing up. Walk Back doesn't tell you which way to the move the rest. It says pick a direction. WTH!

    My modified version of Frenching tuning is nothing more than a shorter distance version. I do this at the archery shop indoors, 9 feet or so (I guess) and then from 30 yards and 33 yards if I desire to do so. I don't use a dot to zero in on at the guessed 9 feet. I use a vertical line set with a level. I use my 30 yard pin setting for both distances. So sight moved to nail the vertical line, which I normally make 1/2" wide, I back up to 30 and shoot dead on. If the arrow is left I move the rest to the right. If the arrow is right I move the rest to the left. Tiny, tiny movements are used and I use a sharp lead pencil to make a mark to go by. The width of the lead pencil line gives a reasonable amount to move.
    I can get finicky or just do a "rush job." Up close I might use a line just thick enough to see and wanting my arrow to cut the line each shot. Doesn't always happen, but close enough is close enough. Back at 30 yards I'll a line thick enough I can see it and I can see a 1/2" wide black or blue line (depends on what wide felt tip pen I happen to pick up). Guys, it works for me. My short version and the full version of French tuning takes time. Each rest correction for the longer distance means starting all over. This is done until there is no need to move the rest at the longer distance.
    My Shadowcats were tuned this way and dead on 50 yard shots were a reality...

    And then my "rush job." Get it close, throw out fliers and get the job done. Yeah, arrows may not be perfect on the line, but then it's works. If I can post the picture; This was outside where I could use the long version of French tuning. I rushed the short distance and shot the longer 55 yard distance. I had to adjust the arrow rest 4 times (once moving the rest too much) and I was close to begin with. So this should tell you how tiny, tiny movements are needed.
    Something just under a 3" group, 55 yards, one arrow on the line and two on either side. I'll take it all day long......
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  9. #8
    Senior Member Mike G's Avatar
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    Sonny, I have done the paper tuning thing in my basement and then have gone outside and done the walk back method on the same bow. In fact my Martin Cougar FC that I shoot now. After the paper tuning I still did some fine movements of the rest.

    With my buddy's bow this past year I just went over installed his rest and eyed it up and had him do the walk back, made a couple of adjustments and in no time at all to me he was shooting very tight groups to 30 yards. About a month later he changed to a different rest and did it himself and said it was the quickest and easiest way he has ever seen or done in the past.

    Yup ... simple as one can get in my opinion.

    Mike

  10. #9
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Bow tuning tip

    Not saying Walk Back doens't work and I've even suggested it to others. The original version has not been changed since 2007.
    Copied from 2007;
    " Hang a weighted string from a nail on a target. [I would hope the string is good thickness because a kite string can be difficult to see 40 yards down range].
    Stick a round sticker on the target face so that the string splits the sticker. Use your existing 20-yd pin, step back 20-yards from the target and fire at the sticker. [First distance]

    Don't worry about where the arrow hits.Walk straight back to 30 yds, and using the same 20-yd pin setting,
    fire an arrow at the sticker. [2nd distance]
    Repeat at 35 yds and at 40 yds, using the 20-yd pin and firing at the sticker. [3rd and 4th distance]

    If your arrows look like this pattern " / " or “\”,
    then pick a direction and move your arrow rest 1/16th inch. [Choose a direction?]

    If the pattern gets straighter (more vertical), then that is great. Keep adjusting in that direction.
    If the pattern gets more crooked, then adjust in the other direction.

    Keep firing arrows and keep adjusting the arrow rest position until you get a vertical pattern of arrows.
    Eventually, your arrows will hit in the target is a straight up and down line like this " | ".

    LOCK down the arrow rest setting. Your centershot is perfect.


    The author of Walk Back tuning has in his tuning guide this; There is a little known secret called MODIFIED FRENCH TUNING (illustrated above) which does what walk back tuning does, but it is much MUCH easier to do.

    For the life of me I can't say easier, but far shorter and with less distances to use. Always there is "dragging out" of procedures. I R not some sand box kid, nor do I believe sand box kids are using either procedure. There is this archery coach who routinely has articles in a well known magazine. The man is indeed quite archery intelligent, but then writes in a manner dictating that of us being children. One too many articles of such and I by-pass his articles like I would the Black Plague. I find it is a small wonder that both the above author and this article writer doesn't have a step by step procedure for nocking the arrow...

    Again, too much within a procedure actually detracts from the value of the procedure. Me; "Zero in on the string at 9 feet." I don't need a step by step procedure to set my sights. Understand me, here?

    I will go a bit farther. I am no all great tuning wiz, but my tuning that works for me, works for me. The above author and another went so far as to say my tuning procedures/setup procedures are far lacking. Whatever lacking really means. I shoot. I compete...not on the national circuit, but club and state sanctioned events I do and quite often.

    Again, I am not great archery shot, but don't bring your "B" game and expect to walk all over me. Aged that I am, I still compete in Adult, not senior in club events. I shoot only Super Senior in ASA events...

    So like many I must submit a resume each year. Since year 2000 I have placed 3rd or better well over 120 times. I can only count 3 or 4 times that I haven't finished in the top ten. So I submitted such information and a picture to the two who wished to disclaim my procedures. They have not responded, nor have they of late detracted from my comments or replies.....

    And by all means, what works for you, works for you. Use it.....
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    Last edited by Sonny Thomas; 12-24-2013 at 10:50 AM.

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  12. #10
    Senior Member Mike G's Avatar
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    Sonny,

    I don't know what method mine is called. I use the same method as you do. After I set the rest and check it in my basement or wherever at about 10 feet, I usually start at about 10yrds, then 15yrds, then 20, and finally 30. I just call it "walk back" because that's what I do. I always thought that's what it was. I'm not sure if the exact yardages are important and I know that the farther the distances the more exact it will be. I always get mine very close and then after I have shot a lot with a new bow I do it again. Right before the Archery Deer Season I check it again. I'll also check it from an elevated position moving the Target, so I guess then it would be called: "Target Move Back". I'm kind of anal at making sure my bow and arrows are tuned and flying right, especially before the season. I want everything to be right and take away that guess work if/when I miss a shot. That way I know it was me, and that's ok. Although, you know there is always that little twig I didn't see....lol

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike G; 12-24-2013 at 01:32 PM.

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