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Thread: Stabilizer weight, too much or too little?

  1. #11
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Stabilizer weight, too much or too little?

    Well, I said before, the Martin gave the new Bengal the good looks it deserved.

  2. #12
    Member Ankhdad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macflash View Post
    Really glad you started this!!, it was going to be my next question for everyone,
    the groups are unbelievably different
    I have a Cobra folding on mine and it's pretty heavy, and if not tight will cause part of my noises I heard ( different post), was thinking about going to a different, lighter, shock absorbing one.
    Now I need to study my shots some more, not sure if it's just too heavy on the front ?, I think I'll try shooting without it to see what happens
    Mac
    Weight was my first concern. I've seen a few at the shop and a couple at the club and they all had nothing to them, very light and used mostly for vibration. I thought about getting one of those 5ft long ones like I've seen on line, but that seemed overkill.
    The first one I made was using AS's tutorial and I thought was working great...until...I added more weight.
    Again...I'm blown away by the difference.
    People keep telling me I have ADD, but they just don't underst.....SQUIRREL!

    2013 Martin 60# (@44lb) Bengal Pro-Skulz!
    FletcherThumb Release, GT Velocity XT 400gr
    Ripcord rest, HHA XL5519

  3. #13
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Stabilizer weight, too much or too little?

    A bit of insight;
    X weight is good, but not overly heavy. X weight distributed properly is better.

    Basically, you want just enough forward weight so the bow tilts forward at the top with the shot and it doesn't have to be radical...just a descent tilt.

    Perhaps a suggestion; Side weight on the left side. Hang bow by the bow string from leveled "J" hooks. Bow will cast to the left. Add just enough weight to counteract the left cast. With you slightly long stabilizer you should seen the lean pretty easily.

    The heaviest hunting stabilizer I have is that I mentioned, my NAP Shock Blocker at 11 oz. My next heaviest is a solid Hoyt Vexor at 10 1/2 oz. Others are kind of short, all steel, 8 and 6 oz.

    My target stabilier is a 30" Cartel weighing in at 7 oz which includes a all steel quick disconnect coupling and a large Max Jax. Of course the coupling and the Max Jax weigh some, but the coupling is close to the bow and perhaps gives more downward weight than weight forward. The Max Jax is right at 3" back of the end and adds 1 oz forward. The only weight of the Cartel is it's end cap at 1 1/2 oz. So weight way forward gives more tilt than a super heavy stabilizer close up. Too much weight way out can be against all that is good. Any wobble input to the bow can make the out front heavy long stablizer amplify wobble, shake.
    Okay, the long Cartel works and works well on my Martin Shadowcat and Pearson MarXman. Both of these bows have scored 300 on the NFAA 20 yard 5 Spot from 30 yards and collected a bunch of Xs doing it.

    That which effects good shooting is more atune to the shooter than a stabilizer. One of the worst ever bows I owned was a Darton Yukon, one of Darton's better kept secrets. The Yukon was one the fastest short bows to come out at the time and startling accurate. BUT! It kicked like a young mule. All I wanted was the kick, recoil gone. Back then our local archery shop, a box store, had a multitude of stabilizers. I went through every one of them (I knew the archery division's employee). Only one tamed the Yukon. It's $110 price tag scared me! So, later I fitted the Yukon with a heavy steel, 5 inch stabilizer that cost way less and worked like a charm. I think some one gave it to me. Owner still has that bow and loves it. Understand, the heavy stabilizer was to tame the kick, not give accuracy.

  4. #14
    Senior Member macflash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonny Thomas View Post
    A bit of insight;
    X weight is good, but not overly heavy. X weight distributed properly is better..............
    Understand, the heavy stabilizer was to tame the kick, not give accuracy.
    Thanks Sonny,
    I'm wondering if anyone has shot an older Firecat, i wouldn't think that Martin of any would need the block of steel on the front for kick, just a little vibe dampener, she shoots smooth with it, been pouring here so I haven't tried without it, been working on noise issues ( another Thread). will let you guys know when I do
    Mac
    A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to
    The United States of America ' for an amount of 'up to and including my life
    .

    '96 Firecat, '66 Herters

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