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Thread: Getting back into the groove.

  1. #1
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    Default Getting back into the groove.

    I've done a lot of shooting for fun, but last night, after reading the thread about the indoor world championship, I decided to set a goal and participate in next years Las Vegas tournament. Problem is, now that I have that in my head, my grouping went haywire. Self-preservation says it was wet fletching because it was rain/snowing out today, but realistic answer probably is the pressure and excitement I just added to my shooting.

    Any advice how to deal with this or how to get out of this funk? I'm shooting a wooden recurve from 20 yards at a paper target.

    Any advice on making it to the tournament would be helpful too. i.e. release technique, qualifying, mental preparedness.

    One more thing, how can I tell I have proper form without someone telling me?

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    Member DeepRiverBowman's Avatar
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    Off the cuff, if just thinking about the LV Open ruins your shot, you've got a lot of work to do and probably should set your sights a little lower until you get some tournament experience. Along those lines, to prepare for a big tournament shoot as often as you can in smaller ones so as to learn the culture and etiquette of tournament shooters and shooting.

    If you want to do this by yourself film your training sessions and practice form in front of a mirror. Many archers shoot too many 'live shots' (shots at a bulls-eye) and only really get good at counting their score. Devote many more practice sessions to work on individual elements of form. Blind bale/blank bale shooting perfects your release and follow-through. Draw and aim w/o releasing. Shoot more arrows than in a tournament to develop stamina. Don't practice during a tournament and don't try new things. Don't score during practice. Practice during practice. Keep shooting when you are shooting well and fall back to simpler practice methods when you are not.

    mike
    Mike Tichenor - President Deep River Bowmen
    Martin Jaguar - Trad Tech Titan - Hoyt Elan

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    Senior Member TEN RING's Avatar
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    The best thing I could add is keep it fun,once you put that self inflicted perssure on your self you can self destruck you used set goals it's one step at a time and you will be much happier with your self and a better shooter been there done that, I put so much perssure on my self at my last world championships I massed up the first day the second day with nothing to lose or win just shot for fun I shoot an almost perfect around, keep it fun
    MARTIN BENGAL
    THE NEED FOR SPEED
    WALMART PRO STAFF SHOOTER

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    I appreciate every bit you guys just told me. I have shot in tournaments a few times when I was in my teens. I suppose the Las Vegas open is probably to high to aim for, but it won't stop me from aiming for it. I like the idea of a shooting at a blank bail, I will definitely incorporate that into my haphazard training sessions.

    I read an article about finger placement and keeping the string arm lower in order to use the back muscles more. That really helped and it was very forgiving if I had a bad release.

    It's pretty incredible that this forum allows me to interact with so much experience and I won't take the advice lightly. Thank you.

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    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
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    Normally I'd tell you to join a club and start shooting field rounds. A field round is 28 targets 4 arrows each from 7 yds to 80 yds, a total of 112 shots. Thats where I started, with just a barebow 45# recurve. Whew! Was I beat by the time I finished! That will build up you stamina, and improve your overall accuracy. But since you're in Alaska, that may be a bit difficult for you. Follow the advice the other guys gave you and you will be more prepared.
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
    http://cascadianbowmen.com/
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

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    Administrator bfisher's Avatar
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    If you want some good reading about the proper way and muscles to use in shooting there's nothing better than Core Archery by Larry Wise.
    If You're Not Living on the Edge You're Taking Up Too Much Space
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    Senior Member TEN RING's Avatar
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    I would shoot as many local shoot was you can to gauge your self, If you had the chance to go to vegas I would still go just for the experance it will go along way in helping you grow, but keep it fun
    MARTIN BENGAL
    THE NEED FOR SPEED
    WALMART PRO STAFF SHOOTER

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    Member DeepRiverBowman's Avatar
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    Along with the Larry Wise book another great resource for infirmation on tournament shooting would be "Masters of the Bare Bow," a 4-volume DVD set with several experts and various techniques for shooting trad style in tournament and hunting situations. You can find it at 3Rivers Archery and possibly Amazon or eBay.

    mike
    Mike Tichenor - President Deep River Bowmen
    Martin Jaguar - Trad Tech Titan - Hoyt Elan

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    Awesome guys. I was messing around with a few new technique ideas (3 fingers below v split, push and pull to draw, and hand grip) some seemed to work for the first shot, then back to haywire. I ended up breaking an arrow and losing another. I will check out the book and the DVD set. Thanks.

  10. #10
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Getting back into the groove.

    Finger experiementing is okay, but you need direction or difinition of... Being a bunch of things out to try, settling on one for Indoor, as you've indicated, is paramount.

    I no longer shoot a recurve, but as a kid I sure flung some arrows. And the archery,gun shop was about a block from school - yep, lunch time and waiting for the bus there I'd be. We didn't have laws about distance of gun stores from schools back then.

    I used the standard three finger split, one above, two under. Aiming was alot instinctive, but then Index, middle and ring finger in the corner of the mouth gave other options of impact. Not done, then there is center of the chin. Oh yes, more options with using index, middle and ring finger.

    Of course, all of the above can be carried over to those shooting instinctive with a compound bow. And I did such about a year or so ago. I had this pretty little Pearson Target bow of old (custom order). I was shooting it indoors at 3D targets at the shop and here comes this older feller. The bow was of ease to draw (37 pounds max) and I was putting the hammer on 3D targets left and right. I was then using the front center of my chin, which this person never saw before. I gave him a crash course of my procedure and he fell in love with my bow...right to the point he bought it. That bow was a great toy and I should have never sold it.

    Another method I really liked was drawing with 3 fingers and dropping off the ring finger upon anchoring. I was quite accurate out to about 40 yards. Back then I never got into NFAA Outdoor or Field shooting, but believe I could have held my own.

    Vegas is a event all of it's own. So I doubt NFAA Traditional rules apply. I don't know what the rules are now for NFAA, but there were almost knock down, drag out fights over how many fingers and placement of. One of our club members went to a meeting and according to him the meeting drug out almost two hours over arguing about this.

    Canting the bow is still used today, just people acquire the same cant time and after time. I have a friend how looks like he's going to fall over when shooting! To me it's part feel and part visual.

    Of the few times I got out my old Target Shakespheres (66 and 72") I aligned the string and arrow, sort of looking straight ahead. And I believe this is used a bunch today. Least wise what pictures I've seen of Vic Wunderle and of Korean shooters.

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