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Thread: Getting back into the groove.

  1. #11
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    Default What I have learned

    I have shot by myself since I moved up to Alaska. The pressure, competition and will to shoot well in front of others has completely gone. So the ability to shoot as good around others, or thoughts of others, as well as I shoot alone with a clear mind does not compare. Through this I have learned a couple things. Be honest to myself. If I hit a target I wasn't aiming for, what good does it do to play it off like that was my original plan. Second, losing the competitive edge is not worth losing.

    DeepRiverBowman, I tried doing the blank bail. That is so difficult in reality to do because I base all my adjustments off of where my arrow landed in reference to where I was aiming. To not think about where the arrow is going is a lot harder than what I thought when I read your suggestion.

    Amazing how much of a mind game this sport is.

  2. #12
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Getting back into the groove.

    Well, blank baling practice is to perfect form throughout. For a recurve I'd think perfection of form would have your arrows impacting at the same point. I don't care where they would impact, just that they impact in the same spot. Then adjusting whatever to have the arrows impact in the bull's eye comes after.

    Competition is what you make it. Set a goal off of one group. Group so big, try to tighten it. It's a calm and collected mental aspect. Do everything the same way each and every time. If the "shot" isn't "there," you let down and start over.

    Of the above shot placement after you acquire form perfection...or consistency may be a better word...
    Seems no two people can shoot the same bow and get the same results for arrow placement. I made a trade a couple years back, my 06 ProElite even up for a 2 month old Martin Shadowcat. The person shot my bow and I shot his before we made the trade. On the 20 yard indoor practice range he slapped two arrows together. I then shot two arrows and busted the nock of the first arrow. Neither of us were on target. We knew what was going on and the trade took place. At this 3D last year DH wanted to try my Pearson MarXman and the target was 30 yards or so. His first shot was low and a good 10 inches right. He then figure point of impact and where he needed to aim, right at the 14 ring of the ASA target. He drilled the 10 ring easily and did it twice.
    Last edited by Sonny Thomas; 04-24-2013 at 07:32 AM.

  3. #13
    Member DeepRiverBowman's Avatar
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    If you have difficulty shooting blank bale and not aiming, try blind bale shooting - same thing only with your eyes closed. The idea behind both methods is to take aiming out of the picture and concentrate on elements of your form. It's also a good way to warm up and prepare for a session where you are aiming. Getting your form working and feeling 'right' then moving to the additional element of aiming improves your shot.

    As has been said, getting your arrows to group well is the first step to an accurate shot. Once you achieve a good group it's a matter of experimenting to find the right anchor, grip, sight picture, etc. to move the group to the center of the bulls-eye. Group shooting can be broken into windage and elevation as well. Put a piece of duct tape vertically or horizontally on your target and work on hitting that. If vertically, work on windage. At any distance put all your shots in the tape irrespective of height. Do the same with a horizontal strip. At any distance put all your shots in the tape. When you work on windage and elevation separately you will find as you improve that the one you're not working on will get closer together too.

    Like I said earlier, we sometimes spend too much practice time shooting 'live' shots. When we combine everything together and shoot bulls eyes we don't know which element is most responsibe for bad shots (or good shots for that matter). A good way to break your shot down into smaller elements to work on is to sit down without your bow and imagine each step of your shot. Write the steps down with sub-steps where needed. Then read each step and perform that step as written. You may find you have left something out or put it in the wrong sequence. Break it down smaller and smaller and try it again. You may find you have a step that says, "Nock the arrow," but no step that says, "Put cock feather out." When you get everything written down and tested to see if the sequence is right then you can work on individual elements. It sound overly simple, but I've seen guys shoot arrows without points, cock feather in the wrong place, not on the rest, etc. I once drew down on a nice buck and found my pendalum sight was in the 'locked' position. The buck didn't wait for me to correct my error! Mistakes cost you points - aviod them by practice and planning. If you have a bad arrow (cracked nock, bad fletch, lost point, etc.) put it in your case, not back in your quiver.

    mike
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  4. #14
    Senior Member typically8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfisher View Post
    If you want some good reading about the proper way and muscles to use in shooting there's nothing better than Core Archery by Larry Wise.
    DITTO. Its all about constant repetition in form.
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  5. #15
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    WOW!, I really like that last paragraph. I spend enough time day dreaming about shooting and every not and then someone at work will catch me pretending to draw a bow.

    I never would have thought to break it down that far. Just like making a syllabus for shooting. Almost a way to score and keep track of each step and to better identify what needs to be fixed. I am shooting traditional with no sights, but it still applies.

    The windage and elevation, thats funny. Too many times I'll have a nice straight line up and down, just not in-line with the bulls eye.

    Sonny, deep riverbowman, elkslayer, Ten ring, bfisher and everyone else, this is awesome. I haven't met any of you's, but I am really enjoying the coaching. Heck, I think anyone can learn something from what you guys (and girls if any, I don't want to exclude anyone) have provided.

  6. #16
    Member DeepRiverBowman's Avatar
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    A "syllabus for shooting" is a good way to put it. Write it down then commit it to muscle memory by constant repetition. Tournament archery is attitude first, form and consistency second, then matched arrows and a balanced bow.

    In the Olympics 90% of the winning is done by 5% of the shooters. Since everyone is shooting the best equipment made, your mental game and form are what makes the difference between winning and having a ncie tournament experience. If you think about it, tournament archery is a sport of consistency (repeatablity). You simply shoot one arrow into the center of the bulls eye and then repaet the shot exactly the same for 59 (or however many shots) more times. If you do everything the same, the arrows will go in the same place every time - assuming your arrows are matched perfectly.

    A balanced bow simply means it sits well in your hand and jumps forward on release consistently. A balanced bow allows you to shoot more like a shooting machine - the same every time. Most any bow will put the same arrow in the same hole repeatably shot from a machine. Getting different arrows to hit the same hole from a machine is where matching your arrows comes in.

    mike
    Mike Tichenor - President Deep River Bowmen
    Martin Jaguar - Trad Tech Titan - Hoyt Elan

  7. #17
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
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    Default How to aim a traditional bow

    Quote Originally Posted by nshepro View Post
    Awesome guys. I was messing around with a few new technique ideas (3 fingers below v split, push and pull to draw, and hand grip) some seemed to work for the first shot, then back to haywire. I ended up breaking an arrow and losing another. I will check out the book and the DVD set. Thanks.
    In the above quoted post you touched on one of the methods of finding an aiming point with a sightless bow. By shooting three fingers under, you bring the arrow up closer to your eye. Which will give a mid range "point on", that is where the point of your arrow in on the target. With my ole Pearson 'Cougar' ( 51#s @ my 30" draw ) shooting split fingers, my point on is 45 yds with the arrows I shoot, same arrows, 3 fingers under, its 30 yds. You can fine tune this method by moving your finger down the string, but you need a constant way of gauging how far down you're holding, with a tab, place 3 fingers under, then hold your thumbnail at the split in the tab, and move down to where your thumbnail is. This is called string walking, you can divide the top section of the tab in half or quartes, gaining differnt aiming points, by moving down the string using those divisions. Using the above string walking and a combitnation of differnt anchors,( forefinger, corner of mouth, middle finger, corner of mouth, under chin) you can move your point of aim out to further distances. It take some expermenting and practice, but can be very accurate.
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
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    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

  8. #18
    Senior Member peace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elkslayer4x5 View Post
    In the above quoted post you touched on one of the methods of finding an aiming point with a sightless bow. By shooting three fingers under, you bring the arrow up closer to your eye. Which will give a mid range "point on", that is where the point of your arrow in on the target. With my ole Pearson 'Cougar' ( 51#s @ my 30" draw ) shooting split fingers, my point on is 45 yds with the arrows I shoot, same arrows, 3 fingers under, its 30 yds. You can fine tune this method by moving your finger down the string, but you need a constant way of gauging how far down you're holding, with a tab, place 3 fingers under, then hold your thumbnail at the split in the tab, and move down to where your thumbnail is. This is called string walking, you can divide the top section of the tab in half or quartes, gaining differnt aiming points, by moving down the string using those divisions. Using the above string walking and a combitnation of differnt anchors,( forefinger, corner of mouth, middle finger, corner of mouth, under chin) you can move your point of aim out to further distances. It take some expermenting and practice, but can be very accurate.
    One time in English for us hard of hearing folks...seems every time someone explains this or writes it out I always end up not quite getting it and say well that's one I will have to catch on sometimes down the road, well I am sixty, 60 years old and there isn't a whole lot of rode left. String walking sky walking, dang I my never get this thing. Not for a lack of good explanations but for my own inability to visualize this thing, but I feel with this explanation elkslayer I am getting closer.
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  9. #19
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
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    Peace,
    I'll try to explain it with photos , look for my thread, Stringwalking, step by step in this forum.
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
    http://cascadianbowmen.com/
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

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