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Thread: Olympic archers and their equipment.

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    Default Olympic archers and their equipment.

    In high power rifle matches, we used to weigh the bullets, sort and trim the brass, trickle the powder, change barrels every so many thousands of rounds and so on. Wondering how carefully do Olympic archers, especially the top guys select their equipment? do they weigh arrows, test spines of each arrow etc? do they use arrows of a standard production run or does the arrow company chose the best of the batch?

    Carl

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    Senior Member Tosi's Avatar
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    Good question carl. I would thinks so, as to down to a nats but. Nock, inserts, special tip weights,,, all. Hope someone chime in, I would like to know...
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  3. #3
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Olympic archers and their equipment.

    Well, it seems Olympic type arrows are now Nanos of high quality - higher than I can afford. Same with the field points. Check Lancaster's catalog. Like you can almost buy a new top end compound bow.
    Fast glance; Arrows, $420.00. Target points, $150 and $250. LORD!

    I live a hop, skip and across the river from Terry Wunderle, Olympic shooter Vic Wunderle's father. By what I heard, Vic's finished arrows weighed within .1 gr, light to heaviest. Which this can be done with standard run arrows. And straightness of .0010" to .0025" can be had with standard arrows. My Carbon Express Pro 150s all weighed within .3 grs, light to heaviest. My Virtue HTA3s are .3 grs and better and straightness is .001" throughout. (Jared Mills hand weighed and scaled my 2 dozen Virtues before shipping them to me.)
    Though I don't try it any more, my best weighed arrows were Carbon Express 300 Selects, .1 gr for the entire dozen. I get within .3 grs and I'm happy.

    Of course important is to buy arrows by the box or bag, not some whatever arrow out of a bin. Virtually all arrows boxed or bagged are hand selected arrows - checked for consistancy. And I once went to local store with my grain scale. Permission granted of course. I hand selected loose arrows of the same brand and model (CX 200s) and weighed each one. And these were factory fletched. Of course I hand weighed each insert and each field point. I went through two dozen field points and ended up grinding a few to the weight I desired. All done I had a dozen finished arrows of .2 grs, light to heavy. These I later sold to a promising 3D and Field shooter.

    Equipment for weighing arrows is easily available. I have three grain scales, 1 is a Herter free floating scale, 1 is a Homac magnetic dampened scale (use the most), and then I have the electronic Box (post here somewhere) that cost a tremendous whopping $20.00 Lancaster shows 1 electronic scale for $40.00.

    A spine tester will cost the most, but readily available. Fast glance, Lancaster shows 2 spine testers and both $300.00.

    Arrow straightness is something else for checking, as in not easy, but can be. Factory straightness checks are from dead center and if something is available I can't find it at the moment. I use Apple's large arrow spinner, about $30.00, I think. Getting nitty gritty for straightness can be time consuming, like seems forever. Here, I've used a Last Word indicator, .0001" reading, and checked every inch between the rollers of the arrow spinner. I no longer do this. I'm not that good to tell the difference of a super straight arrow and one .003". Up close, 40 yards, I can't really tell the difference between one arrow super straight and .006". But like knowing I have something better than .006". All Carbon Express CXLs are given .0025" and I never gave thought of checking.
    Last edited by Sonny Thomas; 07-17-2013 at 07:27 PM.

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    Terry Wunderle a name from my time when I began archery. Good to see him still coaching in archery.
    Seems many things in match rifle and competitive archery are alike. When the rifle club used to order Sierra Bullets, they specified all from one batch or run and from them the close to identical ones were used for matches and the too far off weights for practice.

    The only grain scales I have are the beam balance type for weighing powder but I should get a digital one for arrow shafts, easier to lay a shaft across the scale top.

    Once I'm settled into recurve, I'll get better arrows but right now I'm using economy class arrows just to see what spine is going to work the best. I'm finding the recurve is far more difficult to get tuned up well. I think it's mainly spine, (besides my technique!) I've gone down to 1716's from 1914's and they shoot fair but still seems a bit too stiff.

    I'm still wondering if the top Olympic guys have team mechanics or does the shooter do all the work himself?

  5. #5
    Sonny Thomas
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    Default Olympic archers and their equipment.

    From what I understand most Olympic shooters tweak their own bows. Like compounds no one can tune a bow and expect the owner to have the same results. Me, I will not paper tune a bow for someone. I'll help adjust, but I ain't drawin' and pullin' the trigger. Too many times I've heard; "so and so paper tuned my bow and it rips paper something awful."

    Arrows are possibly done by another and they take enough arrows, dozens. Me, Outdoor and Field, I'd take 2 dozen and hope it was enough - almost wasn't once - busted nocks, cracked arrows, ripped fletching and I robbed one ripped fletched arrow of a nock to finish with 4 arrows - two day championship. Yep, 20 arrows in need of repair or junked.
    Last edited by Sonny Thomas; 07-18-2013 at 06:42 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonny Thomas View Post
    From what I understand most Olympic shooters tweak their own bows. Like compounds no one can tune a bow and expect the owner to have the same results. Me, I will not paper tune a bow for someone. I'll help adjust, but I ain't drawin' and pullin' the trigger. Too many times I've heard; "so and so paper tuned my bow and it rips paper something awful."
    Isn't there a saying "no good deed goes unpunished" or something like that? Yeah, I've gotten to where I don't lend anything. Perhaps I shouldn't be but I've lent out so many things tools, cameras, and always got them back in less than expected condition, some things never got it back, one was, at that time a practically new VCR. The final straw was a Canon 300 mm telephoto lens, went to use it after lending it out and found the images were fuzzy. Took it to the camera repair and they said a element was loose, but no physical outer damage so they said it was probably dropped on a rug or something.

    Carl

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