Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Draw weight question

  1. #11
    Darrenhood
    Guest

    Default

    That's the best news yet, they make 10H limbs?!!!

    Babooze, you can gain or loose a little, like a pound, by playing with the string & cable. The 5 pound difference is in the limbs.

    I still don't understand why they don't just build a 60 pound bow "AT" 60 pounds & if someone orders one & can't draw it, they'll order a 50 pounder next time.

    My old mathews were the same way, 2 identical 70 pound bows that pulled 66 pounds. I could flex the limbs till they broke, but they weren't going to pull 70.

    I didn't figure out my Martin was under till I ordered 80 pound limbs & after putting it together with the stiffer limbs, it just then reached 70 pounds.

    You maybe could turn it into a warrantee issue & not pay for the limbs like I did.

    I bought a 70 pound bow (that wouldn't do it) with the intention of turning it into an 80#. You bought a 60 pounder with the intention of it realy pulling 60 pounds. Sounds like free limbs should be in the mail already.

  2. #12
    Darrenhood
    Guest

    Default

    Morning Bfisher & Flytier.

  3. #13
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Middletown, Pa, USA
    Posts
    11,621
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Babooze View Post

    Ok I twisted, I measured everything and its all in spec..................I am still pulling 55 pounds! Am I being too anal here?
    Do you have the draw length right where you like it? If so then mark the side of the cam where it passes through the limb forks. Use a pencil. This is a reference mark for cam rotation to orient it for your draw length.

    Now, put about 5 twists in the cable. Then put about 10 twists in the string and see if that mark lines up pretty close. My twisting the rigging you will put more prestress on the limbs and the draw weight should go up. The A2A and brace height might change a little, but these are just approximate measurements anyway.

    If the weight goes up to where you want it then measure everything again and write it down and file it for future reference. If not then I think you need a trip to your dealer to see if he can order heavier limbs. If that's not in the cards then call Jake or Joel at Martin customer service and see what they can do for you.

    Let us know what's happening.

    Barry

  4. #14
    flytier17
    Guest

    Default

    Diana, you need to make your own bow. Use a solid chunck of steel for the riser, with truck shox for limbs, no letoff. Then, you wouldn't have to bother us on the mtech forum.

    Is there more sand around?

  5. #15
    Highlander
    Guest

    Default

    I was told by my archery tech that bows perform best when draw weight is maxed out. Any thoughts on this?

  6. #16
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Middletown, Pa, USA
    Posts
    11,621
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    I was told by my archery tech that bows perform best when draw weight is maxed out. Any thoughts on this?
    True, but it's not as much as it's made out to be. As you drop weight off the limbs the bow's percentage of efficiency goes down a tad, but it's not significant enough to matter.

    For instance, say you have a bow set at 70# (maxed) and it's efficiency is 80%. Ifyou are not comfortable at that weight and drop to 65# the bows efficiency might only be 77% or 78%.

    Or another scenerio: A 60# bow maxed produces a speed of 280 fps with a given arrow. The same bow with 70# limbs backed off to 60#, shooting the same arrow might only propel that arrow at 275-276 fps. Again, not enough to worry about.

    However, when maxed out the rigging is tighter so the bow will shoot more quiet, too. Most bows will max a couple pounds over their marked weight--say 63# for a 60 #er. So if you want to shoot 65# you're better off to buy the 60#, put a couple extra twists in the cables and you get a better performing bow all round. Just be sure before you part with the money that it will go that high in the beginning. Or just live with it and shoot at 63#. No animal will be able to tell the difference.

    However, if you plan on keeping the bow for a long time, like 10 years. Then you're better off to get the 70# unit and shoot it at 65#. Limb can and do lose a little over a long time. Maybe two pounds or so in ten years.

    Hope this all helps.

  7. #17
    Highlander
    Guest

    Default

    bfisher,
    Thanks for the reply and the help. My bow is a 70 # and is set at 72 # and is very comfortable and smooth. I was just wondering if my bow would be ok with this set up. The bow shoots like a dream and deadly accurate, 2 inch group of 5 arrows at 40 yds. and little to no vibration now that I put on a new plastic cable guard from Martin and I had my string leeches served in.

  8. #18
    gspjake
    Guest

    Default

    my bow is marked 5h, it is pulling right at 70 pounds. A2A is 32 3/4"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •