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Thread: Bow Speed

  1. #1
    Country Hick
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    Why does the IBO record top speeds with arrows almost too light for the real life scenerio. I am asking because I don't know what arrow weight to shoot but I still want the 300+ fps. and still be able to take down a huge animal at almost any range(am I asking too much from a bow?)? But I do know a heavier arrow is most prefered. I have read articles on fast bows, and once someone shoots a hunting arrow their speed drops drastically and that is almost enough to turn my head away from that bow. AS YOU KNOW BY NOW I AM NOT A VERY EXPERIENCED ARCHER. I also need help choosing an arrow I am pretty sure I will be purchasing a Firecat Pro X. From what I wrote can Someone please help me with my dilema?

  2. #2
    dbd870
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    I find the whole IBO rating scheme pretty annoying as well, but what do you expect.....that's life in the marketing world. Even with all the tricks they use, no fletchings etc. I still sometimes wonder if they (not directed at any one mfr) ever really got the top end speeds they claim Try out the Firecat first as it has a pretty aggressive draw cycle. What are you going to hunt? What do you consider any range? I would discourage long range shots at animals unless one is very proficient.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    I have no problem with the way speeds are recorded. It's true that in the real world of hunting bows nobody is going to achieve those posted speeds, but for now it's one of the easiest ways of comparing one bow against another (or others) to determine which one should end up getting the best speed for any given set up.

    For IBO ratings it makes very little difference what arrow is used, what fletching is on that arrow, point weight, or anything else. The fact remains that it is a 350 grain arrow, shot from a 70# bow at 30" draw through a chronograph at point blank range. No fletching is going to slow an arrow down enough to make a difference at that range. The only variable to this is whether the manufacturer adheres to those standards at the time of the testing and we have no way of actually knowing so.

    I would have to think that the bow being tested is very supertuned and everything done to reduce as much friction as possible, and nothing on the string at the time.

    Let's assume for the moment that a bare shaft is used for the speed test. Because there is no fletching there is no reason to worry about fletching clearance, thus a cable slide is not needed. This is one way of reducing some of that friction---GET IT? Think I could be right? Just a thought.

    The best solution for IBO speed checks, IMO, would be for an independent agency to test the bows instead of each individual company doing their own. Weigh every bow, measure every draw length, use the very same arrow. In other words, set a common standard for all bows.

    Now let's fast foreward to the real world. Very very few people shoot a 30" draw unless they are drawing a couple inches too long. The vast majority should be shooting closer to 28". This means about 20-25 fps less speed right there.

    I don't know anybody who shoots a bow with NOTHING on the string. Add some sort of nocking point or string loop and you're going to lose another 5 fps. Add a peep sight and lose about 3 fps. Kisser button subtracts another 3fps. String silencers can drag another 3 to 15 fps depending on which kind and where they are located on the string.

    Arrow weight is one thing I never discount for. There are enough different brand and kinds of arrows with different GPI measurements to easily attain a 5 gr/inch minimum. There are carbon arrows made that weigh 5.5 to 12.0 grains per inch. From these you can have speed or momentum or anything in between.

    So, Country Hick, how do you expect to achieve your 300 fps with a hunting setup? I have no doubt you can do it if you know or learn how. The first thing you start with is a super fast bow. It doesn't take super high draw weight. And it isn't going to happen if you pick a bow with an "easy draw" cam. You have half a chance is you go with the FireCat or Slayer, but realize you will have to keep the arrow weight around 5 grains per pound (300gr for 60#), and strip anything from the string you don't need.

    So give me some specs to go by such as draw length and such and I can help you get that 300 fps. I actually got more than 300 fps from a 2004 SlayR/Nitrous at 53# and 27.5" draw so I know it can be done.

    Barry

  4. #4
    dbd870
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    The best solution for IBO speed checks, IMO, would be for an independent agency to test the bows instead of each individual company doing their own. Weigh every bow, measure every draw length, use the very same arrow. In other words, set a common standard for all bows.

    Now let's fast foreward to the real world. Very very few people shoot a 30" draw unless they are drawing a couple inches too long. The vast majority should be shooting closer to 28". This means about 20-25 fps less speed right there.
    Agreed w/ above; and I would make the test draw length 28"

    One other thing to keep in mind, the bow that you are approaching your limit to handle on a nice warm 75DEG day will be over your limit on that windy 30DEG day shooting from that twisted position in your tree stand.
    Last edited by dbd870; 04-16-2008 at 04:45 AM.

  5. #5
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    I think 30" ist a very good lenght to test with. Maybe the average draw length in north america is around 28". The most pro shooter in europe have a dl of 30 or more.
    (2) Hoyt PCEXL

  6. #6
    dbd870
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    I don't know how it is in Europe but the majority of bow purchases here are made by hunters, competitive shooters are not a very large percentage; why not cater to the masses?

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    In most of europe bowhunting is forbidden so the most sales go to target shooters.

    Surely it could be changed to another draw lenght but why change? It would lead to less fps that you can advertise and since the most people seem to ask for speed it would be not the best idea.
    (2) Hoyt PCEXL

  8. #8
    dbd870
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    Europe's just the opposite then. For over here I'd like to see the change because the numbers would be a little more realistic. People buy equipment expecting these kind of speeds and are surprised when they don't them. You guys have some long draw lengths over there; Barry's right; most people around here really have more like a 28" draw length, that doesn't stop them from shooting bows set up with draw lengths too long though.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    I agree with you Monty. Being as IBO rating is just a measure of a bows potential compared with other bows it sure would be more in line with the masses to rate bows at 28". Then let those with a 29" draw add 12 fps and us short-assed 27" drawers subtract 12 fps instead of 25 fps. It would make a whole lot more sense.

    Figure it this way. We sell a lot of camo bows in this country because probably 90% of shooters are hunters. By reason it would make more sense to rate bows according to those masses also. And the masses do not shoot anything approaching 30". That's what makes IBO rating so assinine (spelling).

    Can you imagine what kind of pissing and moaning would go on if all of a sudden the rating criteria were to change? Good god, there would be NO bows rated at 340 fps or more. Probably the fastest bows would be about 325 fps. I can hear all the crying now.

    Barry

  10. #10
    Country Hick
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    Barry, I have made my mind up on the SlayerX. I have heard that a heavier arrow is better than a fast one, but on the other hand I want my speed too. I watched Spirit of the wild the other day and Nuge said that he used a 410gr. arrow for the best of both worlds(is this true?). I do not know you but you made me believe that you know what you are talking about. So if you have any information about that that would be great. My draw length is 28" and my draw weight is 70# but if I don't need to pull that much I don't think it would be hard for me to change.

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