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Thread: Timberline No_Peep

  1. #1
    Wick5449
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    Default Timberline No_Peep

    Has anyone tried the Timberline No Peep on their bow. I have read many reviews and as usual, they run from "The greatest aid out there" to "what a piece of junk". I like the idea of it, just wondered what experiences are out there. Thanks, Dan

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    I have no real experience with it, but have seen some on bows. I have my own opinion, of course. It's kind of like a bubble level to me in that it's something to draw my attention away from the aiming process. I think it would work well in situations where you have the time to look at it, like 3D shooting, but for hunting I'm just not sure.

    Something else I've tried and it works well is working on form. The most important part of shooting a bow is learning and perfecting decent repeatable form. If you can do this then you really don't need a peep,a kisser button, or a No-Peep for short distances such as when hunting.

    Maybe someone else can tell you their personal experience with it, but I for one refuse to add some other gadget to my bow for hunting. Lord knows it's getting bad enough as it is.

  3. #3
    geronimo
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    I have used it in the past and it did work well. BTW, when you draw seeing the no-peep is picked up by your peripheral vision.

  4. #4
    southsoundjeff
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    Default Got one....

    I use one on my Phantom II.
    I like it a lot, as it gets a peep OFF the string. The additional benefit, is that it helps to create consistent form, as previously brought up.
    At first, I was looking at it almost constantly, and fluctuating between the no-peep and the bubble level, then back to the sight.....
    What I found, was that in pretty short order, I was anchoring consistently, without torqueing my bow hand, and could figure out level almost instinctively.
    These days, all it takes is a quick glance to be sure I'm level and anchored properly- as I come to full draw. I'm right-on about 95% of the time, so it's there more for verification than anything else. Once I'm at full draw, I'm only thinking of back tension and a steady squeeze.
    It also works fantastic in low-light conditions, as you aren't "looking through" anything. I can see all my pins even before it's light enough to make out the deer.
    'Sorry for the rant. Can you tell I like it?????

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