Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Arrows

  1. #1
    goinhtn63
    Guest

    Default Arrows

    I bought a new Firecat earlier this year. I want to get some new arrows. Just not sure what to go with. I am just curious what you guys are shooting?

    Here are my specs.
    29" Draw
    70#
    Martin Firecat Pro-X
    100g. field tips and broadheads

    Hunting deer and elk in Arizona.

    So which arrow is best and what weight? What total weight can I safely stay in for this bow? I am looking for speed but also good kinetic energy.

    thanks
    Kevin..

  2. #2
    flytier17
    Guest

    Default

    KE will be relatively constant for 1 bow. Heavier arrow goes slower, KE is unchanged for the mosdt part.

    I like the Easton Axis FMJ's. Good arrows built to tight specs, and very durable. Heavy, but not ridiculous. Never had a bad arrow in 3dz. only drawback is the price. 137cdn for me.

  3. #3
    Administrator bfisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Middletown, Pa, USA
    Posts
    11,364
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    After having used a lot of different carbon arrows I don't think ther is all that much difference in the performance a hunter will see. You can choose a light weight shaft to get more speed or a heavy shaft for more momentum and potentially better penetration. The choice is yours. There are very light carbon shafts and there are some that are heavier than aluminum. Each manufacturer has several different ones to choose from.

    Do you have price considrations? There are shafts that can be bought for as little as $50/doz and some that cost $140/doz. Basically they are the same shaft coming off the same mandrel. Then they are hand sorted and checked for tighter tolerances of straightness and weight, the better the quality the higher the price.

    What is more important than weight is to choose a shaft that is properly spined for your bow. In your case I would recommend a .300 spine. It's not necessary to buy the highest price shafts as you probably won't see that much of a difference. You might be able to tell between cheap shafts (.006)and mid-range shafts (.003). That's why I usually recommend something in the mid-range for price and quality.

    There are always aluminum. Then there are all carbon (AC or ACA). Then there are hybrids such as aluminum-carbon-competition (Easton ACC) or Gold Tips (CAA) version of the same. The biggest difference between Easton and Gold Tip's hybrid is the price. One is as good as the other and this is about as good as the "gittin" gets. There is also Easton FMJ shafts, which are similar to ACC's except that the core is carbon and the outer layer is aluminum.

    Howw is your shooting? If you shoot enough you're gong to lose some. You're going to bend aluminum or break carbon. If you don't then you're not shooting enough or you're GOOD, like me (LOL). A dozen arrows last me up to 10 years. Before that there is something new comes along and I switch anyway.

    Something else to consider is availability. You should probably pick something that is locally available. That usually means brands such as Easton, Carbon Express, or Gold Tip. Another company making a name for itself recently is Victory, of which I have no experience.

    Choose your shafts so you end up with a total arrow weight of at least 350 grains (sgaft, fletching, point, insert and all). Really, you should be able to get decent arrows for about $80-$100. Keep in mind the spine rating--.300. This is the important thing. Then straightness and then weight within a dozen.

    Also, there are variations in the arrow making process. With carbon arrows you're not likely to get a full dozen that are perfectly matched. Buy a dozen and you will be doing good to get 10 that are matched perfectly. Live with it. The couple that are not perfect can always be used for summer practice or 3D. They just might not be suitable for good broadhead flight. Again, live with it.

    If you choose CAA, ACC, or FMJ this shouldn't be an issue. Did I mention SPINE????????? You might be right in between a .340 and .300 spine. If in doubt stay a little more toward the stiff side (.300). You'll end up with better broadhead flight.

  4. #4
    goinhtn63
    Guest

    Default

    Thanks alot guys for the input that helps alot. I will shop around my area.

    Kevin..

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •