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Thread: proper arrow length

  1. #1
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    Default proper arrow length

    what is the proper arrow lenght for a 27" draw

  2. #2
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    If the 27" draw is a AMO standard measurement your arrow should be 27", maybe slightly longer or shorter. If you use an overdraw it can be shorter, etc.
    (2) Hoyt PCEXL

  3. #3
    dbd870
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    Some of it is personal preference. I go .5-.75 longer than I need to, no good reason - just like that point being out there a little farther.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbd870 View Post
    Some of it is personal preference. I go .5-.75 longer than I need to, no good reason - just like that point being out there a little farther.
    Same here..
    (2) Hoyt PCEXL

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    How long your arrows should be is quite a personal matter. If you don't feel comfortable with a broadhead back over your hand then you can just keep your arrows longer. If your rest mounts at the back of the riser like many do today and you are OK with that then anything about 1" past the rest is just fine.

    In fact, if your arrow is long enough that it doesn't pull past the rest then it can be said that it is long enough. As I said, it's personal.

    There are a couple things to consider though. Usually, a broadhead tipped arrow will stabilize and fly better if it's a bit longer. Say around 27". Kind of like a longer bullet if you know anything about ballistic coeficients.

    The second thing to take into consideration is spine and weight. For a given poundage and draw-length a longer arrow needs to be stiffer. This sometimes means moving up a notch in the spine charts, which adds more weight to the arrow, costing speed.

    So, there are lots of ways of looking at these things and deciding what your ultimate goal is going to be.

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