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Thread: Long Axle installation???

  1. #1
    SandSquid
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    Default Long Axle installation???

    Can somebody explain (or take a picture of) a Long Axle Kit installation on a right handed bow.

    Installing a Nitrous-X and long axle kit on my daughters bow...

    There are two small plastic washers that go on the outside of the limbs, one is black and thicker, the other clear and thinner.

    Need to know which washer goes on which "side" in relation to the riser/shooter. It really shouldn't matter all that much as there is probably 1/64" difference, but I'm somewhat of a perfectionist.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    John,

    When I instaled mine I didn't even bother with the thin one. What I did do was install the new cable anchor against the limb and then used the stock anchor on the outside. This way I could use either anchor depending how wide I wanted to spread the cables.

    The reason I don't think the thin one is needed is that because the ccable yoke pulls the anchors at an angle they are always being pulled in against the limbs anyway. For 1/64" or so I just let the axle float.
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  3. #3
    flytier17
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    I'd agree with Barry EXCEPT for a recent experience I had with the Scepter. I was shooting it, and the eclip came off. Probably vibrations, but I think the fact that there was a gap between it and the cable anchor, and not something pushing against it might have done something.

    You are setting it up with an "X" system? Heres a hint. Put the long axels only on one limb. Put the OUTSIDE cables on the wide axles, and the insides on the regular ones. This stops the cables from touching, and eliminates friction. The results are threefold.

    #1 On my Slayer, the reduced friction picked up an incredible 8 fps!
    #2 The noise level was audible less.
    #3 The cables will last longer.

    For 3-D and hunting, the fps help. For hunting, less dB helps. And for everything, less cable wear helps.

    Alec

  4. #4
    SandSquid
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    Quote Originally Posted by flytier17 View Post
    Put the long axels only on one limb.
    Put the OUTSIDE cables on the wide axles, and the insides on the regular ones
    .

    This stops the cables from touching, and eliminates friction.

    The results are threefold.
    #1 On my Slayer, the reduced friction picked up an incredible 8 fps!
    #2 The noise level was audible less.
    #3 The cables will last longer.
    Absolutely frickin' brilliant idea!!!!
    And one wide and one regular axle on each bow and get a 2 for one!?!?!
    SHAZAM!!!

  5. #5
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    Thumbs up Super Idea!

    Ya, that is a great Idea I'll need to take a look at that too!

  6. #6
    flytier17
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    I got the idea from a guy who put wooden dowels on both cables to widen 1 set more than the other. Poblem was, he actually took away about 5fps with the weight. He just wanted it quieter. You can do the same with carbon arrows for a bit less weight, but I like this idea better.

    If you needed the long axle for fletch clearence, this might not work. Other than that, it should be fine.

    Alec

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