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Thread: martin trophy hunter/sabre vs Threshold

  1. #1
    bluetick
    Guest

    Default martin trophy hunter/sabre vs Threshold

    I've been shooting traditional and olympic style recurves for a long time. I'd like to get a compound bow. Nothing fancy. I noticed these two inexpensive bows and wondered which you'd recommend for someone new to compounds but not to archery. Can they be used for hunting, as well?

  2. #2
    Coop
    Guest

    Default Do you plan to shoot with fingers or release?

    Most any bow you can use for hunting... I use the Scepter 4 for hunting only (& its called a target bow). Its mostly a personnel choice what bow you use. But if you plan on using your fingers, I would go with a longer ATA bow.

    Coop

  3. #3
    bluetick
    Guest

    Default

    I might use my fingers just for the simplicity. What does ATA stand for?

  4. #4
    Coop
    Guest

    Default Axle to Axle...

    Quote Originally Posted by bluetick View Post
    I might use my fingers just for the simplicity. What does ATA stand for?
    You will need a longer ATA to prevent finger pinch.

    Coop

  5. #5
    Destroyer
    Guest

    Default

    ATA = axle to axle measurement in inches.

    Both bows you mentioned can be used for hunting. Which one? Depends on your budget. The Sabre is made in the US.

    Finger release? Yeah more simple but less accurate.

  6. #6
    bluetick
    Guest

    Default

    The Threshold appears to have an ATA of 35". That seems adequate for either mechanical or finger release, I would think. The arrow length I use on my Hoyt recurve is 27 5/8" from inside of nock to end of shaft. The Threshold is adjustable from 28" to 31" in draw length. Would that be close enough?

  7. #7
    bluetick
    Guest

    Default

    BTW, I read this review. Is this something anyone else has experienced? Is it something to be concerned with?

    y Fernando C. Malacara Jr. "One Shot One Kill"
    This review is from: Martin Archery® Threshold Adventure Series Bow Kit (Misc.)
    I bought the bow from sportsman's guide. It has a good riser and metal cams. It has an issue with the cam stop were it can rotate past the stop point and this can be dangerous because if it does the cam will get stuck leaving the limbs compressed. I had this happen to me the first time I shot it, easy enough to fix just be aware of it. It is an old style bow meaning the limbs are not parallel and it can jump out of your hand if you are new at shooting a bow like me. The sight ring cover is cheap plastic and will not take a beating. The arrow rest is a drop away rest but not fully confined would be better off with a whisker biscuit.

    So now that I made it sound like a piece of crap consider this, the cam stop problem is easily fixed and the bow is 206 dollars with the sportsman's guide club discount. I replaced the sight with a $30 5 pin sight, the drop away rest with a $40 used fully confined drop away rest and added an extra washer to the cam stop bolt to extend its length, plus a $30 stabilizer and bingo for $306 plus tax I have a very accurate 70# bow with all the fixings.

    I recommend this bow to anyone who wants to start with bow shooting and is on a budget like me. You will get an exceptional 70# bow that is very accurate, powerful and best of all affordable.

  8. #8
    Coop
    Guest

    Default Bluetick,

    Thought I would send you some info on compound bows.... theirs lots to read on the site, but will give you plenty of infomation on compond bows. Check out #23 for axle to axle.... Hope you don't mind. http://www.huntersfriend.com/bowselection.htm

    Coop

  9. #9
    bluetick
    Guest

    Default

    Thanks Coop.

  10. #10
    bluetick
    Guest

    Thumbs up

    I went down to Dick's sporting goods and bought a Martin Trophy Hunter. The guy there was extremely helpful. Measured my drawlength, set the bow for 50lbs, and I also bought a mechanical release. Being used to sights from my recurve, there was very little transitional problems. Shoots fine. It's as accurate as my 46 lb Hoyt Medallion, and a whole lot easier to shoot.

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