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Thread: Good Trend or Bad?

  1. #1
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    Default Good Trend or Bad?

    Most of you guys on here have some experience so this is aimed at newer shooters as well as you. We all notice that the price of bows has been escalating in recent years. Technology costs money.

    What bothers me some is how many new or less experienced shooters these days are buying bows that cost $700 or more. I know, to each his own, but it makes me wonder who is giving these guys advice or what they are thinking.

    I'm talking mainly about people who have no clue about even how to install a nocking point on a string, how to adjust the draw weight, or even move a peep so it aligns with their eye. Simple things.

    There are so many bows on the market that cost so much less and would be, IMO, a much better choice for beginners in the event they don't like archery (what's not to like?) or are only going to shoot or hunt once in a while. I just think it's a shame to see many waste good money on a top-o-the-line bow when they could get a complete setup for less and move up as their skills and knowledge progress over the years.

    This is just my thought of course. I come into contact with a lot of newer shooters and am always being asked advice about this or that. I do a lot of informal coaching and tuning, but this is one issue that burns into my soul a bit, although I usually keep my mouth shut (yes, I can do this) about it unless asked.

    What are some of your thoughts.

    Barry
    If You're Not Living on the Edge You're Taking Up Too Much Space
    Martin Gold Plus Staff Shooter
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  2. #2
    String builder/ Super Moderator Hutch~n~Son Archery's Avatar
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    Agreed Barry, when my son (Arrow Splitter) and I started years ago. He started on an inexpensive youth bow and I on a used bow. The Martin pro shop owner respected me because we didn't go spend all outdoors just to start off. Especially when we didn't even know if we are going to like it. Now years later we are all a Martin family. Reason for us is we learned a lot before we bought new. Now I have to say when I recommend people to buy, it is when I teach them something first. And most of the customers we have walk a way with a greater understanding.
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  3. #3
    joelc
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    My personal opinion is that most new archers tend to overpay and overbow themselves into the ultra-fast high performance bows simply because thier buddy does, the shop wants to sell a high dollar bow or a magazine tells them that they have to. I recommend the Martin Cheetah (now the Exile) more than any other bow because it is reliable, easy to tune, plenty fast, easy to shoot and the cost is much less than comparible bows on the market.

  4. #4
    Senior Member alex's Avatar
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    I think nowadays everything made in Europe or America is overpriced and that's why China will kick our ..... pretty soon. My favourite example is the B2 Spirit which costs 2 billion $!!! I've recently heard about an average 100 square metres apartment in Tokyo for 5 million $. Well, a bow for 1000$ isn't that shocking, but still...
    I've dreamed about a compound bow since i was a child (to be honest after watching "Rambo 3" ) and was sure that i'll like shooting it. I had some simple wooden bows made by my grandfathers and by me and wasn't completely new to archery when i first got the chance to take a compound. But i did not buy the most expensive one - started with a relatively cheap Golden Eagle Brave. It was too short for me, but still gave me an idea of compound bow shooting. Then i bought a 55# Perfect Line and tree months later, after positive comments from this forum (from Bfisher and Flytier as far as i remember) i took the MOAB. It was 700$ which is quite a lot for Bulgaria (my salary was 200$ per month then) but i don't regret it. If the US bow prices were close to those of the Taiwanese ones i surely would have 10 already
    2008 Martin MOAB - 45-60#, set at about 51-53# / 55#" Perfect Line" compound/ 55# Mongol horsebow/ 45# "Perfect Line" takedown recurve/ 45# Bearpaw Grizzly hunter recurve/ 55# Samick Longbow Cheetah ... and several homemade bows

  5. #5
    Senior Member Money Man's Avatar
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    I am one of the newer archers on here. Just picked up an older bow from my buddy when he upgraded. First thing I wanted to do was learn to shoot it. So far that has worked. Before I get too crazy spending money, I want someone who knows what they are doing to look at how I shoot and see where I am doing things wrong. Then I want to figure out how to take these things apart, replace or repair, and put them back together and tune them so I don't have to drive to a shop to pay someone else to do something I believe I can figure out on my own.
    For years I have been shooting deer with $300 guns, so I realize you don't have to pay top dollar for equipment. Unless you can out shoot your equipment, you will never know how good that super pricey next best thing could be.
    I also don't believe in scent control clothing, shooting from trees, and most camo. I think if you do your homework and find where the deer are, you sit down and wait for them to come by. My most important things are staying warm to sit until whenever the deer come, not moving too much, and believing in my equipment. Of course now I am moving in a whole new direction. Thanks for listening.

    Dave
    2012 Alien X

  6. #6
    SonnyThomas
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    Default Good Trend or Bad?

    I agree that a lot of new shooters are in the "monkey see, monkey do" way of things. Their buddies have a Mathews or a Hoyt or a Bowtech something or other and have to have the same. How do you beat it? For the most part you can't. We or the vast majority of shops can't have a bow laying around that can fit everyone. I think I have 2 or 3 bows at the shop that most older kids and women can handle, but they aren't the big names they see.

    About a month ago I had this young man come ine and he had only so much money. I had him try a 45/60 Bengal, shoot it on our indoor range. So I gave a discount to help things along. Last I heard from his buddy the young man was in love with the Bengal.

    So I looked in the back room. We have lots of older new bows still in the package. I found one brand new 20 year old (?) Martin that maxed at 50 pounds. I'm fixing it up now. Wash job and new string, it looks pretty good. I'll keep it around for someone to plunk some arrows down range.

    We had one of the NASP bows laying around and that proved about worthless. No one wanted a kid's bow, no sights, low poundage and such. I think the boss ended up giving to some school.
    Last edited by SonnyThomas; 12-01-2010 at 01:18 PM.

  7. #7
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    Hi my name is Stéphane and I'm an archoholic. I got my dad's 20 year-old bow and one of the limb began to delaminate. So, I started the process to buy a new one.

    My pro shop wanted to sell me a $700 bow (not a Martin) - ready to shoot.

    This is when I realised that I needed to do some research and to get what I needed instead of what the guy needed to get off his shelf.

    I ended up buying a 2010 Martin Bengal for $399 Cdn. Even with all the accessories, it will end up being cheaper. Further more, I will have better quality accessories than the package bow I was offered.

    I think, and this is just my opinion, that there are 2 major reasons for the trend, and I think both are bad.

    #1: Archery shops want to unload what they have in the shop before the order a well suited bow for a potential customer.
    #2: New archers maybe led to believe that an expensive bow will override their flaws.


    One last lesser reason could be this one: Buy nice, or buy twice. Could be misguided, but better than the first 2.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ehunter's Avatar
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    I started off on an old Browning "Cobra" Wood riser, laminated wood limb compound. No holes for a sight, just a cushion plunger hole. I shot that for many years, until I got the basics down pretty well. Then over the years, I have upgraded to better and better bows as my talent grew. That first bow maxed out at 46 pounds, now I am shooting 68.
    I think advertising, and "manliness" are the two biggest contributors to overbuying in most things. Gotta have a 3mpg "go anywhere" SUV with 800 horses, those same people have to have a $1500 bow. Like the guy braggin about his Bentley toa farmer. "I've got this $150,000 car, and drive it everyday!" Farmer says "I've got this $300,000 combine, and only drive it a month a year."

  9. #9
    Senior Member Money Man's Avatar
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    @ ehunter, don't forget the folks that need to buy a 5000 sq foot house that they can only afford it, if both are working, so 2 people end up living in the house because they can't stop working to have kids, or afford daycare if they do. So what do 2 people do with 6 bedrooms and 3 living rooms? I have only figured out how to occupy one couch at a time.
    2012 Alien X

  10. #10
    Senior Member Rangerj's Avatar
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    In my area most everyone has to have a Mathews or Hoyt and they spend a lot for them. I have 2 Martins, a 2010 Cheetah and a 2010 Tr2 Firecat. I have both of these excellent bows all set up close to the price of one of the others.I don't follow the hype with all the marketing. I bought Martin because a friend has had one for 20 years, and dropped 20 feet from a tree twice with no damage.And the reputation of the company.To me these bows shoot as good as any others, I am the problem LOL

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