View Poll Results: Single Cam or Dual cam, which do you guys prefer?

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  • Single Cam

    11 37.93%
  • Dual Cam

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Thread: Single Cam or Dual cam, which do you guys prefer?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by copterdoc View Post
    Ummmmmm, yes!

    I am certain that Martin no longer offers any dual cam option on their current bows.

    They have singles and Binaries, only.

    A hybrid cam is completely different from either one, and the "Hybrix" cam is a brand name, not a cam type.
    I agree. And the Nitro is not a Nitrous either.
    (2) Martin ShadowCat 2010

  2. #22
    Senior Member bowgramp59's Avatar
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    i thought a dual cam bow was a bow with a cam on each end of the bow and a single cam bow is 1 cam with an idler wheel. please explain a dual cam bow.
    curtis

    2010 nemesis camo, 2011 nemesis carbon fiber,
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  3. #23
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    The simplest explanation is, that a dual cam uses a split yoke to anchor one end of the cable to the axle. A "Slaved Binary Cam" anchors one end of the cable to the opposite cam, and it runs on a reverse track, that feeds out cable as the bow is drawn back.

    This reverse feed, prevents the cable from going slack, if one cam is pulled "harder" than the other.

    The only exception, is the Bowtech Overdrive Binary cam. It uses a split yoke cable, anchored to a "crankshaft" that keeps the cams "slaved", for the last half of the draw.

  4. #24
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    - Not sure where I got this from.
    It may be something that Copterdoc posted somewhere else here, or on another forum. Or it may have been written by someone else.
    It is, however, a great explanation of the cam systems.

    "Cam systems differ in the way they connect each other together and in the way they compress the limbs.

    Cam characteristics differ, in the efficiency, shape of draw force curve, and let-off% they provide.

    There are four basic cam systems.

    (1.) Dual cam
    (2.) Single cam
    (3.) Hybrid Cam
    (4.) Binary cam

    A dual cam system, uses each cam, to pull the opposite limb tip towards it, by attaching it's cable to the axle of the opposite cam. Each cam pulls the other limb towards itself the same amount. If only one cam is turned by the string, the limbs are compressed the same amount as if both cams were turned. The only difference is, that one cable will be holding the entire load of the limbs.

    A single cam system, compresses the limbs by attaching a single power cable to the top limb at the axle of the idler wheel. The single cam feeds the string off the string track below the nock, and off a reverse string track over the idler and above the nock.

    A hybrid cam system, works the same way as a single cam, except instead of using a round idler wheel and one long shoot string, it uses an eccentric idler wheel, that is slaved to the cam, with a control cable. Instead of having a super long shoot string, it cuts the string in half and attaches the two ends to the eccentric idler wheel. The bottom cam and power (buss) cable is what actually compresses the limbs.

    A Binary cam system, works the same way as a dual cam, except instead of attaching the cables to the axles, it attaches them to the opposite cam, so that as cable is reeled in by one cam, it is also being fed out in a lesser amount by the reverse track of the opposite cam. Since the cables are pulling both ways on each cam, one cam cannot rotate, unless the other cam rotates with it. If only one cam is rotated, the other will rotate with it, and they will both compress the limbs together, even if the shoot string is slack on one of the cams."

  5. #25
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    awesome!! i just learned alot!!! thanks guys!!
    2010 rytera x. apache rest, truglo 5pin. 8in shockbocker 1000 stabilizer. norway g2 string tamer Huch-n-Son strings
    2010 rytera z apache carbon rest axt primal x5 sight

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spiker View Post
    - Not sure where I got this from.
    It may be something that Copterdoc posted somewhere else here, or on another forum. Or it may have been written by someone else.
    It is, however, a great explanation of the cam systems.

    "Cam systems differ in the way they connect each other together and in the way they compress the limbs.

    Cam characteristics differ, in the efficiency, shape of draw force curve, and let-off% they provide.

    There are four basic cam systems.

    (1.) Dual cam
    (2.) Single cam
    (3.) Hybrid Cam
    (4.) Binary cam

    A dual cam system, uses each cam, to pull the opposite limb tip towards it, by attaching it's cable to the axle of the opposite cam. Each cam pulls the other limb towards itself the same amount. If only one cam is turned by the string, the limbs are compressed the same amount as if both cams were turned. The only difference is, that one cable will be holding the entire load of the limbs.

    A single cam system, compresses the limbs by attaching a single power cable to the top limb at the axle of the idler wheel. The single cam feeds the string off the string track below the nock, and off a reverse string track over the idler and above the nock.

    A hybrid cam system, works the same way as a single cam, except instead of using a round idler wheel and one long shoot string, it uses an eccentric idler wheel, that is slaved to the cam, with a control cable. Instead of having a super long shoot string, it cuts the string in half and attaches the two ends to the eccentric idler wheel. The bottom cam and power (buss) cable is what actually compresses the limbs.

    A Binary cam system, works the same way as a dual cam, except instead of attaching the cables to the axles, it attaches them to the opposite cam, so that as cable is reeled in by one cam, it is also being fed out in a lesser amount by the reverse track of the opposite cam. Since the cables are pulling both ways on each cam, one cam cannot rotate, unless the other cam rotates with it. If only one cam is rotated, the other will rotate with it, and they will both compress the limbs together, even if the shoot string is slack on one of the cams."
    Yeah, that's my writing.

    I posted it on AT a few years ago.

  7. #27
    String builder/ Moderator Hutch~n~Son Archery's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copterdoc View Post
    Yeah, that's my writing.

    I posted it on AT a few years ago.
    I thought that was your typing! just kidding!
    info is great for those who want to learn.
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  8. #28
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    I had always shot dual cams until about 2004 I tried one of Darton's cam and half. Loved it, shot it for a few years with Dartons and Hoyts. Then bought a Matthews LX to hunt with. Found out a single cam ain't so bad either. Shot a Matthews Prestige in tourns. all last year. Not a bad bow either. For 2011 I got a Shadowcat, back to a sort of dual cam. So I've really don't have a general preferance. I can shoot them all badly
    Charlie

  9. #29
    Super Moderator Arrow Splitter's Avatar
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    This thread convinces me even more to go with a hybrid cam when I get another bow.
    2011 Martin Firecat 400/NAP Apache Dropaway/Truglo Xtreme Sight/Custom 8" Stabilizer/Victory V6 Arrows
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  10. #30
    Senior Member alex's Avatar
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    And what is "cam and a half"? I know the other 4 types but this "one and a half" confuses me.
    2008 Martin MOAB - 45-60#, set at about 51-53# / 55#" Perfect Line" compound/ 55# Mongol horsebow/ 45# "Perfect Line" takedown recurve/ 45# Bearpaw Grizzly hunter recurve/ 55# Samick Longbow Cheetah ... and several homemade bows

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