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Thread: Brass nocking point or Tie?

  1. #11
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    Tied nock with Catfish.


    I do not set tiller. I tune via different cables and drawboard.
    (2) Hoyt PCEXL

  2. #12
    String builder/ Super Moderator Hutch~n~Son Archery's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HawgEnvy View Post
    I also use the D-loop w nock between. Plenty accurate for me.

    as far as a "properly tillered" bow. Could someone elaborate on that? I've always set even tiller. Is there an advantage to a different approach?
    Right from the manual
    Setting The Tiller
    Taking a tiller measurement allows you to check the relative tension
    setting of the upper and lower limbs. After setting the draw
    weight on your bow, you will need to check the tiller measurement
    to make sure that you have adjusted your limbs evenly. On all Martin
    compound bows, 0 or even tiller will shoot perfectly. However, the tiller
    measurement can vary up to 1/4 closer at the bottom. There is
    no set measurement that provides peak performance for every
    shooter. To measure your tiller, simply measure from the limb pockets
    to the string on both ends of the bow. Some shooters find that different
    tiller measurements from "0" work better for them. It will not hurt your
    bow in any way if you experiment with tiller.
    Note: Your Peep Sight position and your nock point position can
    change when you turn one limb bolt. Take detailed measurements
    and be sure that your nock and peep are correct each time you
    turn your limb bolts.
    Measuring

    Hutch
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  3. #13
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
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    Just the D loop, tied above and below the nocking point.
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
    http://www.cascadianbowmen.org/
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

  4. #14
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    as far as a "properly tillered" bow. Could someone elaborate on that? I've always set even tiller. Is there an advantage to a different approach?
    I tiller my bow for this reason. The point at which your loop is tied on is not at the half way point between the axles, it is more towards the upper axle causing the upper limb to exert more force than the lower. To compensate for this, you can ease off on the top limb or wind down the bottom limb, or a combination of both. For your information, when recurve and long bows are built, the bottom limb is always made 'stiffer' than the top limb.

    The result is a much smoother draw and better arrow flight. For example, when tuning your bow through paper, you may find you are getting a low tear, it generally means you have to shift your nocking point higher. Sometimes that nocking point rnds up in a ridiculously high position which can actually be dangerous.

    This problem can be solved by easing off the top limb and or, adding turns to the bottom limb as described above. I never have to raise my nocking point by more than 1/8" from square due to the fact I 'tiller' my bow before I begin any serious tuning.

    I must point out however, that the various ways different archers attach loops, their form, and where they place nocking points etc, means the 'tillering' process will vary from person to person.

    Hope this helps

  5. #15
    String builder/ Super Moderator Hutch~n~Son Archery's Avatar
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    Thanks gibson 787 info well spoken or should I say typed.



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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gibson 787 View Post
    ....The point at which your loop is tied on is not at the half way point between the axles, it is more towards the upper axle....
    Mine are right in the middle, for my Bullet-X risers.
    Quote Originally Posted by gibson 787 View Post
    ....causing the upper limb to exert more force than the lower. To compensate for this, you can ease off on the top limb or wind down the bottom limb, or a combination of both. For your information, when recurve and long bows are built, the bottom limb is always made 'stiffer' than the top limb.....
    This is completely false.

    Compound bows are not recurves. You are not pulling the limbs with the string. You are merely turning the cams, which reel in the cables, and the cables compress the limbs.

    Making a tiller adjustment doesn't make either limb "stiffer". It merely moves the riser up or down in relation to the limb tips.

    You can tell yourself anything you want, all you are doing with a tiller adjustment, is changing your nock point, and the peep is following it.

  7. #17
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    Compound bows are not recurves. You are not pulling the limbs with the string. You are merely turning the cams, which reel in the cables, and the cables compress the limbs.
    Not going to get into any argument with you pal, just relaying what I read on another forum. Tried it several years ago and it worked. Incidently, I don't use a peep.

    If I'm steering people down the wrong path, then I apologise, I'm certainly no builder of wheel bows, my background is traditional and have built many self bows over the years.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by HawgEnvy View Post
    I also use the D-loop w nock between. Plenty accurate for me.

    as far as a "properly tillered" bow. Could someone elaborate on that? I've always set even tiller. Is there an advantage to a different approach?
    what he said.

  9. #19
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    problem i have with d loops is that they always seem to eventually close up leading to a pinch on the nock. thinking about adding brass nocks with the d loop tied above and below the brass nocks.

    opinions?

  10. #20
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    I do not like brass nocks. Tie your own ones with serving yarn or something like that.

    Brass nocks are heavy although someone else said just some posts ago that they do not affect speed. Well... I do not need to care about speed at all. Brass nocks can cut into the serving and the string if pressed onto it with sharp edges they may have.
    (2) Hoyt PCEXL

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