Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 39

Thread: Stabilizing a crack

  1. #11
    Senior Member ElkSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,098
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elkslayer4x5 View Post
    I just knew someone would catch me with which is the front of a bow! Can't slip nuthin past you guys.
    should have just called it what it was, not simplified it.
    It's all fun an games till you put that big boy on the ground.. now its time to get to work
    Martin cougarIII elite nitrous C cam X system & HHA
    Darton Fury recurve

    http://www.cascadianbowmen.org/

  2. #12
    Administrator bfisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Middletown, Pa, USA
    Posts
    11,360
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scepterman30x View Post
    BTW the target side is the back of the bow...more for enlightenment and not criticism.
    I used to correct guys with this statement, too, but gave up. Our younger generations know very little about bows, terminology, or history. I made a comment like this once on AT and got slapped on the wrist for my efforts.
    If You're Not Living on the Edge You're Taking Up Too Much Space
    Martin Gold Plus Staff Shooter
    Alien Mafia
    PSAA Life member, UBP Life member
    PADI AOW Diver

  3. #13
    Senior Member NuttyNative's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Fernley Nevada
    Posts
    566
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bfisher View Post
    I used to correct guys with this statement, too, but gave up. Our younger generations know very little about bows, terminology, or history. I made a comment like this once on AT and got slapped on the wrist for my efforts.
    That happens alot over there (AT) people just trollin for stuff like that. If I were to try and fix that, I would use carbon fiber resin, at the very least mix ground up carbon fiber to an epoxy resin. That works in high tech R/C cars, very durable.
    I'm a Lefty


    2011 Martin Ridge Hunter
    2012 Rytera Alien Z

  4. #14
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Lane County, Oregon
    Posts
    2,558
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gibson 787 View Post
    Never tried, but thought about it and never heard of any attempts. No torque is definitely a plus, so the only way to find out is to give it a go using the strongest epoxy available. You will need to apply heat and that needs to be done carefully so as to not weaken existing lamination joints
    My thought was to use gravity and the hot sun and let a slow setting carbon fiber resin settle into that lamination crack to seal it off and prevent any further movement. Any other ideas on how to inject the resin into the split?
    Last edited by elkslayer4x5; 02-22-2011 at 06:49 PM.
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
    http://cascadianbowmen.com/
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    380
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My thought was to use gravity and the hot sun and let a slow setting carbon fiber resin settle into that lamination crack to seal it off and prevent any further movement. Any other ideas on how to inject the resin into the split?
    I think I would use a hair dryer for heat which would really thin the epoxy and gravity would certainly let it seep into the crack. Wheather it seeps in enough is the problem. I would then place a 1/2" high piece of wood the same length as the crack over the crack, then bind it with the limb as tight as possible with 1" strips of inner tube rubber or similar. NB. You will need to put a thin piece of plastic sheet, or something that won't bond to the glue, between the wood and the bow so you won't end up glueing the wood to the bow. Reason for the wood is to exert as much downward pressure on the crack as possible.

    Had another thought. Go to www.3riversarchery.com which is a traditional shop, and put the task to them, they certainly have the right glues for the job and would likely be able to give you a few tips as well.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by gibson 787; 02-22-2011 at 08:10 PM. Reason: add information

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,684
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gibson 787 View Post
    I think I would use a hair dryer for heat which would really thin the epoxy and gravity would certainly let it seep into the crack. Wheather it seeps in enough is the problem. I would then bind the limb as tight as possible with 1" strips of inner tube rubber or similar.

    Had another thought. Go to www.3riversarchery.com which is a traditional shop, and put the task to them, they certainly have the right glues for the job and would likely be able to give you a few tips as well.
    Sorry for getting off the track here but I just looked at 3rivers site and I have just got to order a couple of those 'whistling points'.
    (Maybe they should be posted on the thread about usless junk to spend our money on...)
    I gotta have one tho - just to mess with people next time I go to a shoot...

    As far as the op - I'm all for fix-it-yerself and there is some good suggestions here but - I just dont think I would shoot very well knowing that I have a possibly broken limb that I patched up.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    380
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I gotta have one tho - just to mess with people next time I go to a shoot...
    LOL! yeah, thought about it myself

  8. #18
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Lane County, Oregon
    Posts
    2,558
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gibson 787 View Post
    I think I would use a hair dryer for heat which would really thin the epoxy and gravity would certainly let it seep into the crack. Wheather it seeps in enough is the problem. I would then place a 1/2" high piece of wood the same length as the crack over the crack, then bind it with the limb as tight as possible with 1" strips of inner tube rubber or similar. NB. You will need to put a thin piece of plastic sheet, or something that won't bond to the glue, between the wood and the bow so you won't end up glueing the wood to the bow. Reason for the wood is to exert as much downward pressure on the crack as possible.

    Had another thought. Go to www.3riversarchery.com which is a traditional shop, and put the task to them, they certainly have the right glues for the job and would likely be able to give you a few tips as well.

    Hope this helps.
    I had planed on using lightweight plastic between the limb and the heavy webbing I'll use to isolate the limb from the clamps, was going to coat the plastic with a release agent, vasoline should work. I'll see the 3rivers has to say. Which is a funny coincidence, the nearest archery shop to me is in Dos Rios.
    http://eastoutfitter.tripod.com/index.html
    http://cascadianbowmen.com/
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

  9. #19
    Senior Member alex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bulgaria
    Posts
    1,366
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Elkslayer, i think you should take the smallest drill and make a tiny hole at the beggining of the split/crack - no more then a mm deep i guess. (I'm not sure about this, but that's the way to prevent a breakage when you have a crack on a circular saw.) Then you can fill it with epoxy. Another thing i'd do is to wrap the limb with some kind of tape (camo one would be fine) - not to save the limb from breakage, but to save you if it explodes.
    Last edited by alex; 02-23-2011 at 12:56 AM.
    2008 Martin MOAB - 45-60#, set at about 51-53# / 55#" Perfect Line" compound/ 55# Mongol horsebow/ 45# "Perfect Line" takedown recurve/ 45# Bearpaw Grizzly hunter recurve/ 55# Samick Longbow Cheetah ... and several homemade bows

  10. #20
    Senior Member alex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bulgaria
    Posts
    1,366
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiker View Post
    Sorry for getting off the track here but I just looked at 3rivers site and I have just got to order a couple of those 'whistling points'.
    (Maybe they should be posted on the thread about usless junk to spend our money on...)
    I gotta have one tho - just to mess with people next time I go to a shoot...

    As far as the op - I'm all for fix-it-yerself and there is some good suggestions here but - I just dont think I would shoot very well knowing that I have a possibly broken limb that I patched up.
    Scott, do you plan using the whistling points with a compound or with a recurve? I've made some and strangely they worked better with a recurve, don't know why, guess the speed of the arrow is too much with a compound bow.
    2008 Martin MOAB - 45-60#, set at about 51-53# / 55#" Perfect Line" compound/ 55# Mongol horsebow/ 45# "Perfect Line" takedown recurve/ 45# Bearpaw Grizzly hunter recurve/ 55# Samick Longbow Cheetah ... and several homemade bows

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •