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Thread: Best All Around Martin Bow???

  1. #11
    Senior Member elkslayer4x5's Avatar
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    Why, the Slayers, of course! LOL.,and as for the best cam, thats real easy, Nitrous Cams, especially the B's. Unfortunally, I'm ape armed, a long draw and have to shoot C's. Also like the Cougar lll Elites. Nitrous camed, of course.
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    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, shoot thru, 63lb, Quiktune 3000, HAA OL 5519, Beman ICS Hunter
    Martin 06 Slayer, Nitrous C, Shoot thru, 55lb, Quiktune 3000, HHA OL 5519 2X, Easton A/C/C
    Ben Pearson 1968 'Cougar' 62" 45#s @ 28" recurve, parallel shaft POC, Zwickey 'Eskimo' 2 blade

  2. #12
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    Having only shot Martin bows since 2004 my experience with anything prior to that is nil, but I think I'm going to diverge from everybody and say the 2004-2005 Slayer with Nitrous X cams, and I'll tell you why.

    It had the necessary length and mass weight to be a decent target bow. It was a superb 3D bow because of it's speed and length. Go to any money shoot and you won't see anything shorter than about 37-38" for those who are serious shooters. At 37 3/4" it fit right in this category. And contrary to popular belief this is not too long to hunt with. Sure, short bows can be used for all these venues, but nybody with any experience knows that target and serious 3D shooting is not done with short bows.

    The Slayer also had X cams, which could be set up and tuned so there was NO lateral nock travel so everything shot right down the middle. No cable guard meant the string traveled straight forward on the shot. Also, those Nitrous cams are the only ones that I could obtain an honest 300 fps with a 27" draw and 5 gr/lb. Even the Cat/Nitro/Hybrix cams don't come close.

    If you want to include newer models then look no further than the 36" Rytera Alien Z. The Nemisis might fit in, but I'll take the longer a2a any time.

    I'm also drawing my conclusion partly based on the idea that, being a little better than average shooter, I shoot a lot of target and 3D; maybe 8,000 shots a year. For hunting I might shoot 20 shots a year to tune, and practice with broadheads. So just at what venue do I consdier the most important? Surely not hunting. I can take those few shots with any bow.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfisher View Post
    Having only shot Martin bows since 2004 my experience with anything prior to that is nil, but I think I'm going to diverge from everybody and say the 2004-2005 Slayer with Nitrous X cams, and I'll tell you why.

    It had the necessary length and mass weight to be a decent target bow. It was a superb 3D bow because of it's speed and length. Go to any money shoot and you won't see anything shorter than about 37-38" for those who are serious shooters. At 37 3/4" it fit right in this category. And contrary to popular belief this is not too long to hunt with. Sure, short bows can be used for all these venues, but nybody with any experience knows that target and serious 3D shooting is not done with short bows.

    The Slayer also had X cams, which could be set up and tuned so there was NO lateral nock travel so everything shot right down the middle. No cable guard meant the string traveled straight forward on the shot. Also, those Nitrous cams are the only ones that I could obtain an honest 300 fps with a 27" draw and 5 gr/lb. Even the Cat/Nitro/Hybrix cams don't come close.

    ]If you want to include newer models then look no further than the 36" Rytera Alien Z. The Nemisis might fit in, but I'll take the longer a2a any time.

    I'm also drawing my conclusion partly based on the idea that, being a little better than average shooter, I shoot a lot of target and 3D; maybe 8,000 shots a year. For hunting I might shoot 20 shots a year to tune, and practice with broadheads. So just at what venue do I consdier the most important? Surely not hunting. I can take those few shots with any bow.
    bfisher, thanks for the input, very informative. It appears you lean towards 2 cam bows. Are they inherently more accurate? I went to the Rytera sight and also noticed these bow are pretty expensive. Is it a "you get what you pay for" situation? Being new to Martin I wasn't sure how much Rytera and Martin were the same manufacturer.
    Chasman, 2010 Martin Bengal 60#,Parker Phoenix 60#, Parker Hornet 70#. Hutch-n-Son strings.'Makes a lot of sense if you don't think about it!

  4. #14
    Super Moderator bfisher's Avatar
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    Yes, I do favor dual cam bows and by that I mean dual cam, not single, not hybrid, and not Binary. Maybe it's because I started shooting compounds when there was no choice. They were all dual cam, or saying it correctly dual wheel bows as they had round wheels. I shot dualies from 1973 to 1997.

    In '97 I joined with Golden Eagle the Pearson in 2000 to 2004. During this time I made a switch to single cams, mostly because that's all they offered and because single cams were the latest and greatest at the time. A lot of the hype cam about as those were the early days of fastflight string/cables and the material wasn't as good as it is today. The early fastflight would creep a lot changing the cam sync on dual cammed bows. I remember watching my peep change orientation just going from the sun into the shade and back into the sun. It was crazy. The single cam became the answer to this problem.

    Single cams have their issues, too, most of which have been addressed over the years. One of them was unlevel nock travel another was cam lean which became more evident as we became more educated about it. Cam lean (actually idler wheel) can be changed by twisting a cable yoke where it attaches to the outer part of a limb. The thing about a single cam bow is that if there is any cam lean at the bottom cam it cannot be adjusted. You get what you get. This creates lateral nock travel which is discussed on other threads here. How severe it is depends on just how much the cam is leaning. True dual cammed bows can have both yokes twisted to alleviate most of the problem, but latral nock travel will never be gone so long as we use some sort of system pulling the cable(s) to the side for fletching clearance. But the good news is that in either system the bow can be tuned to shoot acceptably. You're starting to see the cam lean issue addressed with the Martin TRG, Bowtech flex guard and others.

    This is a couple reasons I favor dual cams. More recently I've had both single and dual cams within the same bow configuration. Most notably a 2008 FireCat and a 2009 Moab. These two bows are identical except for the cams. Doing some testing I shot both over a chronograph shooting the same specs and the same arrow. The FireCat with Cat cams was consistently 15-20 fps than the Moab with M2Pro cam. Speed wasn't my primary concern here. What was of concern was how much weight I had to draw to get the same performance with each bow. The easier drawing Moab with m2Pro cam had to be shot 8# higher in draw weight to get the same speed as the FireCat. 8# that I didn't care to draw and at the time couldn't control very well. I also noticed that the harder cammed FireCat wasn't very hard at all when backed down to something I could handle. So, to my way of thinking, why draw more weight when I can get the same speed with less?

    Sorry I got long, but I do that for the sake of providing details as I have experienced it. Now on to the Rytera vs Martin thing. Essentially when buying a Rytera vs Martin you are paying for a nicer bow with fancier machining to the riser. You gotta admit. They are sharp looking. For the last two years Rytera was using Barnesdale limbs while they engineered and manufactures the new Power Tuff limbs. Now, as I understand it, Power Tuff limbs are the standard on all the Martin/Rytera bows. They all have Hammer Head strings. The cams are essentially the same, as are the Roto cups and all the other parts. So if the Martin line fits your wallet better then just close your eyes and dream it's a Rytera.

    One of the biggest reasons I am shooting Rytera is because I like a longer a2a bow and have a fairly short draw length, usually between 26.5" and 27", and it's hard to get what I want. Rytera makes it and I am selective. My FireCt was 32 1/2" and although I liked it I still prefer a longer a2a. Right now my short bow is the Nemisis at 34" and that's as short as I care to go. I have my own reason for that, too.
    If You're Not Living on the Edge You're Taking Up Too Much Space
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  5. #15
    Senior Member Simple Life's Avatar
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    Warthog,shot one once and would have bought one this year,but Martin dropped it.Kinda of a shame.
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  6. #16
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    SL ...What was the attraction? Would you grab a used one if the op presents itself? Are you talking about the 2010 watrhog mag?
    Last edited by cjchasman; 04-05-2011 at 11:12 AM.
    Chasman, 2010 Martin Bengal 60#,Parker Phoenix 60#, Parker Hornet 70#. Hutch-n-Son strings.'Makes a lot of sense if you don't think about it!

  7. #17
    Senior Member Simple Life's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjchasman View Post
    SL ...What was the attraction? Would you grab a used one if the op presents itself? Are you talking about the 2010 watrhog mag?
    Well I was hoping for a 2011Longer AtA,and a little heavier.Plus it has some zing!!
    I would like to pick a used one up,but I will never see one around here and with a new FC,my wife would kill me
    2011 Firecat 400
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    2012 PSE Brute X

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by HawgEnvy View Post
    the ultimate Martin bow is the one you shoot. I haven't shot alot of Martin's, but the ones I have are nice shooting bows. I'd still like to get my hands on a 2010 Warthog mag some day. My Martin dealer still hasn't got the 2011 line in yet due to a bad Martin rep not doing his job.
    you have a PM

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